Available as a mix of on campus and online courses!

Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematics

Prepare yourself for a wide range of opportunities with a solid foundation in mathematics. UMass Lowell's B.S. in Mathematics offers a great way to advance your career in mathematical science.

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Suggested Program of Study - Total Credits: 126

For students entering the program in or after September 2005

Mathematics has long played an integral role in advances in science and technology. And in today's high-tech, information-based economy, a background in mathematics is a highly valued commodity.

At UMass Lowell, students in the Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematics develop valuable and transferable skills in critical thinking, quantitative analysis and problem solving - skills necessary for success in a broad range of fields.

Offered by UMass Lowell's Department of Mathematical Sciences through the Division of Online and Continuing Education, this part-time degree program features a robust program of study designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the science of mathematics including calculus, physics, discrete structures, applied statistics, propositional logic, methods of proof, relations and functions, applications to computer science and more.

UMass Lowell's Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematics differs from the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Mathematics in that more science courses are required.

The following course outline, which lists 3 courses each semester, is only a suggested course load. First-year students should not take more than 1 or 2 courses their first semester. Subsequent course loads may be determined by the student's own personal time constraints. Courses are conveniently scheduled on campus in the evenings, and some of the electives are available online, to meet the needs of busy adults. Please note, that while some of the courses required for this degree may be completed online, this program is not available entirely online. Face-to-face courses are required.

* The purpose of concentration electives is to allow students, with the assistance of their Faculty and Student Support Specialist, to take advantage of the many state-of-the-art courses available at the University: science, information technology, engineering, decision science, actuarial science, operations research, mathematical biology, bioinformatics, economics, computer science, etc. A student may take a maximum of 15 credits of math courses (MATH prefix) as concentration electives. MATH.2830 and MATH.3630 cannot be used as math electives.

** Electives may be chosen from any courses from the University. However, no more than 60 mathematics credits (beyond MATH.1200 and MATH.1230) can be counted toward graduation. All mathematics courses have prefix MATH.

# Analysis I & II requirements: One basic analysis course (MATH.4030, MATH.4110, MATH.5010) and one additional analysis course not used to fulfill another requirement (MATH.3010, MATH.3220, MATH.3620, MATH.4030, MATH.4110, MATH.4130, MATH.4200, MATH.4210, MATH.4500).

## Students may receive credit for both MATH.3850 and MATH.3860.

Many 5000-level mathematics courses are within the grasp of upper level undergraduate students. Refer to the day school schedule of classes for graduate course listings. Many graduate courses are offered in the late afternoon/early evening time frame.

Course Descriptions

ECON.2010 Economics I (Microeconomics)

Studies the principles of production and exchange. An introduction to demand, supply, pricing, and output under alternative market structures. Derived demand and resource markets are introduced. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL). 3 credits. Special Notes: BS

ENGL.1010 College Writing I

A workshop course that thoroughly explores the writing process from pre-writing to revision, with an emphasis on critical thinking, sound essay structure, mechanics, and academic integrity. Students will read, conduct rhetorical analyses, and practice the skills required for participation in academic discourse. Students will write expository essays throughout the semester, producing a minimum of four formal essays. 3 credits.

ENGL.1020 College Writing II

A workshop course that thoroughly explores the academic research writing process with an emphasis on entering into academic conversation. Building on the skills acquired in College Writing I, students will learn to write extensively with source material. Key skills addressed include finding,assessing, and integrating primary and secondary sources, and using proper documentation to ensure academic integrity. Students will produce analytical writing throughout the semester, including a minimum of four formal, researched essays. 3 credits.

ENGL.2260 Technical and Scientific Communication

Studies the theory and practice of letters, memoranda, reports and oral presentations on specific scientific and technical problems. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL.1010/1020 pre-req Special Notes: Students may not receive credit for both ENGL.2240 and ENGL.2260; Students will learn about scientific and technical communication by engaging with lab reports, step-by-step instructions, technical manuals and so forth. This course gives students the opportunity to write two chapters in a technical manual by the end of the course. These chapters will include step-by-step instructions on how to fix, prepare, create, or describe a function or process related to a specific individual project.

MATH.1200 Precalculus Mathematics I

Intended for students whose background in basic algebra is current. The course objective is to provide students with problem solving and computational techniques needed for further course work and in their occupation. Topics covered include: linear equations, slope of a line, quadratic equations, functions, transformations, inequalities, curve sketching, systems of equations, and the exponential and logarithmic functions 3 credit(s) Prerequisite: 90.11 or equivalent or satisfactory score on the Math Placement Exam given the first week of class. Credit is given for only one of the following courses; 92.120, or 92.121. 3 credits. Special Notes: Credit is given for only one of the two following courses: 92.120 or 92.121.

MATH.1230 Precalculus Mathematics II

Reviews angles and their measure, the trigonometric functions, solving triangles, law of sines, law of cosines, circular functions and their graphs, vectors and trigonometric identities. No credit in Science or Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 1210 pre-req Special Notes: MA. Students may not receive credit for both 92.123 and 92.124.

MATH.1250 Calculus A

Serves as a first course in calculus and provides a brief review of analytic geometry and trigonometric functions. The course progresses to the study of inverse functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, rules for differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, chain rule, implicit differentiation, linear approximation, differentials, and maximum and minimum values. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH.1230 pre-req Special Notes: MA. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: MATH.1220 or MATH.1310.

MATH.1260 Calculus B

Serves as a continuation of MATH.1250. The course covers L'Hopital's Rule, optimization problems, Newton's method, sigma notation, integration, area between curves, volume, arc length, surface area, integration by parts, trigonometric substitution, partial fraction decomposition, and improper integrals. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH.1250 pre-req Special Notes: MA

MATH.2210 Linear Algebra I

Elementary set theory and solution sets of systems of linear equations. An introduction to proofs and the axiomatic methods through a study of the vector space axioms. Linear analytic geometry. Linear dependence and independence, subspaces, basis. Inner products. Matrix algebra. Applications of the above will also be discussed. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 1320 pre-req

MATH.2220 Linear Algebra II

Linear transformations. Linear operators, change of basis, inner product and the diagonalization problem. Quadratic forms. Convex sets and geometric programming, input/output models for an economy, Markov chains, other applications of linear algebra. 3 credits.

MATH.2250 Calculus C

Serves as a continuation of MATH.1260. This course covers integration by parts, integration of trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fraction, numeric integration, improper integrals, L'Hopital's Rule, indeterminate forms, sequences, infinite series, integral tests, comparison tests, alternating series tests, power series, Taylor series, polar coordinates, graphs and areas in polar coordinates, and parametric equations. 3 credits. Special Notes: MA

MATH.2260 Calculus D

Serves as a continuation of MATH.2250. This course covers curvature, cylindrical surfaces, dot and cross products, curves and planes in three space, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, functions of two variables, chain rule, directional derivatives and gradient, tangent planes, and double and triple integrals in rectangular, polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH.2250 Pre-req Special Notes: MA

MATH.2340 Differential Equations

Topics include methods of solutions for linear and non-linear first order differential equations, linear second order differential equations, higher order linear differential equations, systems of first-order differential equations. Laplace transforms. Numerical methods. Applications to physical systems. 3 credits.

MATH.3210 Discrete Structures I

Presents propositional logic, combinatorics, methods of proof, mathematical systems, algebra of sets, matrix algebra, relations and functions, recursion and generating functions, applications to computer science, and graph theory. 3 credits.

MATH.3750 Senior Seminar I

Student works with an advisor to develop a proposal for a senior project that will be carried out as part of MATH.4750 Senior Seminar II. Generally taken during the spring of the junior year. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1 credits.

MATH.4750 Senior Seminar II

Undergraduate seminar on advanced mathematical topics. Students are required to develop an understanding of an advanced subject beyond the scope of an existing course or synthesize two or more different areas form their curriculum. Students are required to participate in the seminar, present their results to the Department and write a substantial thesis in their topic area. Essential course elements include library research, original research, and both verbal and written exposition. The first semester is a graduation requirement for majors in mathematics. 3 credits. Special Notes: Senior Status Math majors

PHYS.1310 Technical Physics I

Presents material in both the class and laboratory format. Topics include: vectors; one- and two- dimensional motion; Newton's laws of motion; translational and rotational equilibrium; work and energy; linear momentum; and circular motion and gravitation. Two additional Friday night classes are required. 3 credits.

PHYS.1320 Technical Physics II

Covers material in both the class and laboratory format. Rotational dynamics; mechanical vibrations and waves; sound; solids and fluids; thermal physics; heat and law of thermodynamics will be discussed. One session per week. Two additional Friday night classes are required. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHYS.1310 pre-req Special Notes: SL

Program Requirements s

All bachelor's degree candidates are required to earn a minimum 2.00 cumulative grade point average (GPA), to present a minimum of 120 semester hours, to fulfill the residency requirements, to conform to the general regulations and requirements of the University, to satisfy the regulations and academic standards of the colleges which exercise jurisdiction over the degrees for which they are matriculating, to satisfy the curriculum requirements established by the departments or programs in their major, and to complete the University's General Education requirements, which are listed within the program's curriculum outline. For additional information regarding the University's general policies and procedures, transfer credit information and residency requirements; please refer to our Academic Policies & Procedures.

Registration

The Division of Online and Continuing Education offers courses during the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters. Approximately 2 months prior to the start of each semester, we post the upcoming semester course schedule on our website. Once you know which course(s) you would like to take, current students can register using SIS self-service, while new students, who have not already applied and been accepted into the program, must use the Non Degree Registration Form.

You may take courses without being officially enrolled in a certificate or degree program, but you must meet the particular course prerequisites. Registrations are accepted on a first come, first served basis. Class size is limited. We recommend that you register early to reserve your place in class.

For more information, please visit our Registration Information Page.

Tuition

Please refer to our tuition and fees page for up-to-date pricing information or refer to the Online and Continuing Education Course Bulletin each semester.

Transfer Credits / Credit for Prior Learning

Have you taken credit courses at another accredited college or university in the past? You may be able to count those courses towards your degree at UMass Lowell. Please review our transfer credit policy and email our advisors at Continuing_Education@uml.edu for additional details.

New Students

If you have not already applied and been accepted to the program.
Register with Non Degree Reg. Form

Current Students

If you have applied, been accepted and currently in a program.
Register with SIS self-service

Questions:

Online & Continuing Ed Support:
Email our Student Support Center for assistance, or call for advising at (800) 480-3190 and press 1 to speak with an advisor.

Restrictions

RESIDENTS OF Arkansas, Kansas and Minnesota: State and federal laws require colleges and universities to be authorized to offer online degree programs in states other than their own. Due to these regulations, the University of Massachusetts Lowell is unable to accept applications or registrations for online courses, degrees or certificate programs from residents of Arkansas, Kansas or Minnesota. Current UML students that move their residence to one of these states should contact Catherine_Hamilton@uml.edu in Online and Continuing Education to determine their eligibility to continue their program of study.

Please Note: While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information presented within this website, the Division of Online and Continuing Education reserves the right to implement new rules and regulations and to make changes of any nature in its program, calendar, locations, tuition, and fees. Whenever possible, appropriate notice of such changes will be given before they become effective. In registering for courses, each student assumes full responsibility for knowledge of and compliance with the definitions, regulations, and procedures for the University as set forth in our Academic Policies & Procedures and on the main UMass Lowell website.

Applying into an Undergraduate Degree Program

Complete the Online Undergraduate Degree Application Form (preferred), or print, complete and submit the Undergraduate Degree Application .pdf form. Please note: Your application will be processed once we have received your $60 application fee. Return your completed application along with your application fee to:

University of Massachusetts Lowell
Division of Online & Continuing Education
OCE Admissions - Southwick Hall, Rm 203
1 University Avenue
Lowell, MA, 01854

Questions? See our helpful Step-by-Step Guide to the Application Process.

Admission Requirements

To be considered for acceptance into a bachelor's degree program offered through the Division of Online and Continuing Education, students must hold a high school diploma or have passed either the GED® or HiSET®. Online and Continuing Education operates on a rolling admissions basis and each application is reviewed when the student's file is complete. Students must be admitted to a degree or certificate program in order to be eligible for most financial aid.

Apply Online

Questions Regarding Your Application?

Email OCE_Admissions@uml.edu or call (978) 934-2474.

For General Assistance:

Call or email the Online and Continuing Education Student Support Center at (978) 934-2474 or (800) 480-3190. Our team of Student Support Specialists are here to help!

Already Applied?

Check the Status of Your Application

Fees

There is a $60 application fee when you apply into this undergraduate degree program.

Restrictions

RESIDENTS OF Arkansas, Kansas and Minnesota: State and federal laws require colleges and universities to be authorized to offer online degree programs in states other than their own. Due to these regulations, the University of Massachusetts Lowell is unable to accept applications or registrations for online courses, degrees or certificate programs from residents of Arkansas, Kansas or Minnesota. Current UML students that move their residence to one of these states should contact Catherine_Hamilton@uml.edu in Online and Continuing Education to determine their eligibility to continue their program of study.