Available entirely online or as a mix of on campus and online courses!

Bachelor of Science Degree in Information Technology

Advance your knowledge of information technology and earn your Bachelor's degree by taking a variety of IT courses in programming, information systems, database development, computer networking, operating systems and more.

Get more information today:

Your Future in IT Starts Here

The need for highly skilled professionals with the latest knowledge of information technology continues to grow. UMass Lowell's Bachelor's Degree in Information Technology offers a cutting-edge program designed to prepare students for positions in a world increasingly centered around Information Technology.

With UMass Lowell's wide array of IT course offerings, students are able to study a number of different subjects including programming, networking, database management, website design, multimedia and more. Courses are available in topics such as Java Programming, Web Development, Linux / UNIX Systems Administration, Network Security, and Relational Database Concepts.

The Bachelor's Degree in Information Technology is available entirely online, or as a mix of online and on-campus courses - providing a high degree of flexibility and convenience for busy adult students and working professionals.

As a non-profit public institution, UMass Lowell is dedicated to providing an education that's affordable and world class - and it's all backed by the academic integrity of a top-ranked research University.

Not sure which courses to take first? See our Example Program of Study.

Ranked as a Top Online Bachelor's Program by U.S. News & World Report.

Jennifer P.
Bachelor's Degree in Information Technology Graduate The flexibility of the online program allowed me to be able to stay up later than my children so I could actually do the reading and get the assignments done when I needed to.

Curriculum Outline

40 Courses / 120cr

Focus Area Electives (6 Courses / 18cr)

Choose 6 Courses (18 Credits) from one of the following four focus areas.

Please contact the Student Support Center for advising at 1-800-480-3190 or email Continuing_Education@uml.edu for details.

Arts & Humanities Focus:

Choose six courses from this focus area or six courses from one of the other three focus areas.
A sampling of courses from this focus area includes, but is not limited to:

Social Sciences Focus:

Choose six courses from this focus area or six courses from one of the other three focus areas.
A sampling of courses from this focus area includes, but is not limited to:

Management Focus:

Choose six courses from the Manning School of Business, or six courses from one of the other three focus areas.
A sampling of courses from this focus area includes, but is not limited to:

Math, Science, Engineering Focus:

Choose six courses from this focus area or six courses from one of the other three focus areas.
A sampling of courses from this focus area includes, but is not limited to:

Additional courses in the Math, Science & Engineering focus area can be browsed using the following links: Math, Biology, Life Sciences, Chemistry, Atmospheric Sciences, Environmental Sciences, Geology, Physics, Radiation, Mechanical Engineering Technology, Electronic Engineering Technology. Note, not all of these subjects will have courses offered every semester, and some of the courses might only be offered on campus - please check the course delivery format before you register for a course.

The Benefits of Learning Online with UMass Lowell

The University has built a solid reputation by offering one of the largest selections of online programs available through a traditional university. Courses are taught by full-time faculty who are experts in their fields, and by adjunct faculty who, as practicing professionals, bring real-world experience to the online class discussions.

At UMass Lowell, we are committed to providing you with high-quality, affordable online programs that make earning your degree or certificate more convenient than ever before. Our students have access to online course technical support 24X7, and our academic advisors and program coordinators are happy to help you with your questions.

Course Descriptions

ACCT.2010 Accounting/Financial

Presents a comprehensive, detailed exposure to basic accounting theory. Beginning with the accounting equation, students are introduced to the accounting cycle, preparation of the statement of financial position and the income statement, accounting for assets, liabilities, and stockholders' equity of the firm, and cash flow and financial statement analysis. 3 credits.

ACCT.2020 Accounting/Managerial

Examines the use of accounting systems for managerial decision-making. Budgeting, forecasting, and cost accumulation systems, which relate to manufacturing systems, will be studied. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ACCT.2010 pre-req

ACCT.3010 Intermediate Accounting I

Examines the generally accepted accounting principles relating to the preparation of financial statements. The student will study, in depth, the valuation and disclosure problems associated with the assets of the enterprise. The accounting framework and pronouncements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board are emphasized. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ACCT.2020 pre-req

ACCT.3210 Cost Accounting

An examination of the manufacturing function from the view of the cost accountant. Managerial control of the elements of product costs will be studied with an emphasis on cost accumulation systems both historical and estimated. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL). 3 credits. Prerequisite: ACCT.30 with 'C' or above pre-

ACCT.4310 Federal Income Taxes

Deals with the basic rules and regulations of the Internal Revenue Code as it affects the individual and the corporation. An understanding of the code is developed through lectures, assigned readings, research, and the solution to a wide variety of problems. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Information Literacy (IL). 3 credits. Prerequisite: ACCT.2020 pre-req

ARHI.1010 Art Appreciation

The course introduces the student to the technical, aesthetic and historical aspects of architecture, sculpture, and painting. An analysis of the visual elements used in fine arts such as color, line, shape, texture, and principles of design are developed through slide lectures, museum visits and assigned readings. In addition, students investigate the purposes of art and visual communication and develop a heightened sense of critical thinking that allows them to investigate successfully different modes of representation, styles and media in a multicultural society. 3 credits. Special Notes: AE, CD, HSA

ARHI.3020 Studies In World Art

Historical and critical examination of regions works of art from China, Asia, the Islamic world, India, Africa, North America, Latin America, Native American Art and Mexico. Topics vary from year to year. Course may be repeated. 3 credits. Special Notes: AE, HSA

CHEM.1010 Applied Chemistry for Non-Scientists

Provides an understanding of basic chemical principles -- atomic structure, bonding and interparticle forces, physical and chemical properties of matter through hands-on examination of matter and the application of principles to understanding the chemistry of current issues (e.g., environmental chemistry, biochemistry, food and drug chemistry) and the analysis of problems dealing with these issues. This course is not available for credit for Science or Engineering majors. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Not for Science & Math Majors. Special Notes: SCL

CHEM.1020 Forensic Science for the Non-Scientist

This course presents the inherently fascinating topics of crime and criminal investigations as a pathway for teaching the fundamental chemical concepts most often covered in an introductory non-majors course. This course capitalizes on the surge of interest in the scientific investigation of crime (as sparked by CSI and other television shows) and will collate the theme of forensic science with the fundamentals of chemistry. The course material will be continually updated with each offering. 3 credits.

CHEM.1210 Chemistry I

Provides an introduction to the basic concepts of chemistry through classroom discussions and demonstrations. Topics include chemical calculations, atomic structures, the periodic table, basic bonding theory, solutions, liquids, and gases. Restricted to science, engineering, and engineering technology majors. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CHEM.1230L co-req Special Notes: SL

CHEM.1220 Chemistry II

Serves as a continuation of CHEM.1210. Topics include thermodynamics; kinetics, acids and bases; an introduction to organic chemistry; chemical equilibrium; precipitation reactions; and electrochemistry. Restricted to science, engineering, and engineering technology majors. 3 credits. Special Notes: SL

COMP.1130 Exploring the Internet

An introduction to internet technologies and how they intersect with social, political, and economic issues. Includes: the history of the internet, how it's presently managed, how information is transferred between servers and clients, collaborative web technologies, search engines, encryption, digital rights management, certificate authorities, phishing and other malware, and privacy concerns. Students will build a basic website using HTML and CSS. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Not for CS majors Special Notes: Non-CS Majors only

CRIM.1010 The Criminal Justice System

This course resents a brief history of the Criminal Justice System and an analysis of its structure and function. This course required of all CJ majors and is a prerequisite for all other courses in criminal justice. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA). 3 credits. Special Notes: For permission numbers and questions regarding the Undergraduate Criminal Justice Program, please email Christopher_Harris@uml.edu

CRIM.1150 Introduction to Homeland Security

This course will encompass the study and relationship between those entities and institutions necessary for the protection of the United States. Course instructional material will examine the components of Federal, State and Local Police Agencies, as well as the role of Private Security and Emergency Responders needed to facilitate the implementation of the Homeland Security Act. Particular attention will be focused on Policy, Plans and Procedures at governmental and community levels. 3 credits. Special Notes: For permission numbers and questions regarding the Undergraduate Criminal Justice Program, please email Christopher_Harris@uml.edu

CRIM.1410 Introduction to Policing

This course provides an examination of the historical development of police work with special emphasis on the conflicting role expectations facing police officer. 3 credits. Special Notes: For permission numbers and questions regarding the Undergraduate Criminal Justice Program, please email Christopher_Harris@uml.edu

CRIM.2030 Technology and the Criminal Justice System

This course is designed to introduce students to the latest innovations in the applications of new technological advances in the criminal justice system. Topic areas include an examination of the new technology of crime commission, and the corresponding new technology of crime control strategies. Our focus will be on the application of both hard technology (e.g. equipment, hardware, devices, etc.) and soft technology (e.g. computer software programs, information systems, classification devices, and other problem-solving applications) in each of the following areas: crime prevention, police, courts, institutional corrections, community corrections and the private sector. 3 credits. Special Notes: For permission numbers and questions regarding the Undergraduate Criminal Justice Program, please email Christopher_Harris@uml.edu

CRIM.2130 Emergency Management

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the various ways in which a corporation and local municipality can plan for a disaster before it occurs. Topics covered include risk identification and assessment of multi-hazards whether natural and man-made, violence in the workplace, development of crisis and disaster incident management programs, and business/agency continuation planning. 3 credits.

CRIM.3430 Forensic Psychology

This course examines the application of psychological theories, principles, and research to issues of concern to the criminal justice system. 3 credits. Special Notes: For permission numbers and questions regarding the Undergraduate Criminal Justice Program, please email Christopher_Harris@uml.edu

CRIM.3970 Crime Mapping

This course examines the use of new technologies to analyze crime patterns and develop crime prevention strategies. Students study theories that explain the geographic distribution of crime and learn how to use Geographic Information Systems to study crime in ways that draw upon theory as well as how to apply GIS techniques in the law enforcement and corrections fields. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CRIM 3900 or PSYC 2690 pre-req Special Notes: For permission numbers and questions regarding the Undergraduate Criminal Justice Program, please email Christopher_Harris@uml.edu

CRIM.3980 Criminal Justice Data Analysis

The student is introduced to computer software packages (i.e. SPSS) used to analyze large quantitative data sets common in criminal justice/criminology. This course is seen as the capstone to the research methods/technology component of the major, and is intended for upper level students, especially those preparing for graduate study. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CRIM.3950 Pre-req Special Notes: For permission numbers and questions regarding the Undergraduate Criminal Justice Program, please email Christopher_Harris@uml.edu

CRIM.4010 Substance Abuse and Crime

Covers the problems posed by substance use/abuse and examines the role and impact of the legal, criminal justice, and public health systems, as well as current treatment/intervention approaches. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CRIM 1010 or CRIM 2210 Pre-req Special Notes: For permission numbers and questions regarding the Undergraduate Criminal Justice Program, please email Christopher_Harris@uml.edu

CRIM.4780 Child Maltreatment

This course introduces students to empirical findings and theoretical perspectives concerned with the maltreatment of Children and youth. One of the major course goals is to balance the view of children and youth in the criminal justice system by focusing of their victimization instead of exclusively on their offending behavior. 3 credits. Special Notes: For permission numbers and questions regarding the Undergraduate Criminal Justice Program, please email Christopher_Harris@uml.edu

ECON.2010 Economics I (Microeconomics)

Studies the principles of production and exchange. An introduction to demand, supply, pricing, and output under alternative market structures. Derived demand and resource markets are introduced. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL). 3 credits. Special Notes: BS

ECON.2020 Economics II (Macroeconomics)

Studies the principles governing the level of national income and employment. Also examines the commercial banking system, monetary and fiscal policy, the international economy, and alternative economic systems. 3 credits. Special Notes: BS

ECON.2110 Statistics for Business and Economics I

Presents descriptive statistics, sophisticated counting techniques and other components of probability, simple random variables and their distribution, bivariate functions, sampling theory properties of estimators. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 1210 pre-req

ECON.3020 Labor Economics

An introduction to the economic analysis of behaviors and institutions in the labor market: labor supply and participation, labor demand by firms, wage determination under different institutional settings, and gender, race or ethnicity as determinants of different labor market outcomes. The course presents microeconomic models, empirical findings and their public policy implications on topics such as minimum wage, affirmative action, social insurance prorams, workplace safety, and subsidized day care. Prerequisites: 49.201 or instructor's approval. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Quantitative Literacy (QL). 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON.2010 pre-req Special Notes: HSV

ECON.3030 Microeconomic Theory

Provides an advanced examination of price and production theory and the theory of the consumer and the firm. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON.2010 pre-req

ECON.3160 Investments: Instruments and Strategies

In this course we will look at different types of investments, from stocks, bonds and real estate top mutual funds, hedge funds and derivatives exploring how and when to use them. Students will create a diversified investment portfolio using an online trading program that incorporates products covered in class. In addition we will look at how different exchanges operate and the role of financial investments in real capital accumulation and rising living standards. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON.2010 pre-req

ENGL.1010 College Writing I

A workshop course that thoroughly explores the writing process from pre-writing to revision, with an emphasis on critical thinking, sound essay structure, mechanics, and academic integrity. Students will read, conduct rhetorical analyses, and practice the skills required for participation in academic discourse. Students will write expository essays throughout the semester, producing a minimum of four formal essays. 3 credits.

ENGL.1020 College Writing II

A workshop course that thoroughly explores the academic research writing process with an emphasis on entering into academic conversation. Building on the skills acquired in College Writing I, students will learn to write extensively with source material. Key skills addressed include finding,assessing, and integrating primary and secondary sources, and using proper documentation to ensure academic integrity. Students will produce analytical writing throughout the semester, including a minimum of four formal, researched essays. 3 credits.

ENGL.2120 The Short Story

Studies the development of the short story from Poe and Chekhov to the present. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL.1020 pre-req Special Notes: AH

ENGL.2240 Business Writing

Studies the theory and practice of writing letters, memoranda and reports on specific business and technical problems. Registration preference for students enrolled in Business programs. 3 credits. Special Notes: Note: Students may not receive credit for both ENGL.2240 and ENGL.2260

ENGL.2260 Technical and Scientific Communication

Studies the theory and practice of letters, memoranda, reports and oral presentations on specific scientific and technical problems. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL.1020 pre-req Special Notes: Students may not receive credit for both ENGL.2240 and ENGL.2260; Students will learn about scientific and technical communication by engaging with lab reports, step-by-step instructions, technical manuals and so forth. This course gives students the opportunity to write two chapters in a technical manual by the end of the course. These chapters will include step-by-step instructions on how to fix, prepare, create, or describe a function or process related to a specific individual project.

ENGL.2380 Introduction to Creative Writing

A course for aspiring creative writers among freshman and sophomores which offers an introduction to the craft of creative writing in its primary genres: poetry, fiction, drama, creative non-fiction (emphases will vary depending upon instructor). The focus of this course will be on learning the fundamentals of craft techniques and peer review. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL.1020, or instructor permission

ENGL.2400 Literature and Women

A survey of literary attitudes toward women from the Judaic and Hellenic periods through the present. 3 credits.

ENGL.2980 Children's Literature

A survey course covering traditional and contemporary children's literature. Texts are selected to represent different historical periods and a diversity of authorial perspectives. Attention is given to changing views of children and childhood as reflected in selected texts. 3 credits.

ENGL.3100 Writing Popular Fiction

This course is designed for students who are interested in writing in one or more of the popular forms of genre fiction: the mystery, the horror story, science fiction, fantasy, romance, and the thriller. Class time will be spent discussing and work-shopping student writing. Some time will also be devoted each week to brief lectures on practical matters like choosing between the short story and the novel, finding ideas, constructing plots, building characters, pacing, generating suspense, and marketing one's work. In addition, there will be assigned readings to illustrate the above. 3 credits.

ENTR.3000 Principles of Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Course number was formerly 64.300. This course is designed to help non-business students understand the importance of innovation and entrepreneurship in todays global economy and cultivate an entrepreneurial mindset among students in the Manning School of Business entrepreneurship concentration. It will cover different forms of entrepreneurship such as small businesses, growth ventures, corporate entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship. The course will focus on the types of innovation, turning innovation into an ongoing new venture and on the entrepreneurial process. Innovation and entrepreneurship theories and concepts will be discussed with real life examples and cases. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Sophomore level or higher

ETEC.1300 Electrical Basics and Laboratory

This course introduces the basic principles of electrical engineering, including the concepts of voltage, current, resistance, inductance and capacitance. Ohm's Law, Kirchhoff's Laws, superposition, Thevenin's theorem, and Norton's theorem will be covered. Alternating current concepts, frequency response and filters are discussed. The use of laboratory power supplies and measuring instruments such as oscilloscopes, voltmeters, ammeters and ohmmeters are demonstrated. Written reports are required. 2 credits.

ETEC.2130 Electric Circuits I

Discusses: electrical circuits; voltage, current and resistance; energy, power and charge; Ohm's Law, Kirchhoff's Current Law and Kirchhoff's Voltage Law; simplification and conversion techniques for networks containing sources and/or resistance; Thevenin's and Norton's theorems; fundamentals of magnetism and magnetic circuits; properties of capacitance and inductance and associated transient behavior of circuits. 3 credits.

ETEC.2720 Introduction to Alternative Energy

This course surveys the available alternative energy sources. Alternative energy sources such as solar, wind and thermal are discussed and applied to practical applications. This course will focus on how the different types of alternative energy are used singularly or in a combined alternative energy package in residential, commercial and utility applications. Both grid connected and stand alone applications are reviewed and discussed. 3 credits.

ETEC.3410 Logic Design I and Laboratory

This course studies numbers, switching (Boolean) algebra, switching functions, and combinational circuits. Number systems and conversion. Binary codes. Switching algebra. Algebraic simplification of switching functions. Canonical forms of switching functions. Switching function minimization using Karnaugh maps. Two-level and multi-level combinational circuits. Gate conversion. Decoders, encoders, multiplexers, and demultiplexers. Programmable logic devices: read-only memories, programmable logic arrays and programmable array logic. 3 credits. Special Notes: 17.341 Logic Design I and Lab and 17.342 Logic Design II and Lab replace 17.346 Logic Design A, 17.347 Logic Design B and 17.348 Logic Design C.

ETEC.3450 Programmable Logic Controllers and Lab I

This course introduces Programmable Logic Controllers from a fundamental perspective and analyses of programming and operation from a practical point of view. We will look inside the PLC and cover general programming procedures, basic functions along with intermediate, data handling, and advanced functions. There will be laboratory sessions with Koyo DLOS modules and using Koto PL Software, PLC simulating software will also be used in homework problems. 3 credits.

ETEC.3500 Control Systems I

This course covers the concepts of feedback; open loop and closed loop systems, feedback in electrical and mechanical systems, mathematical models of systems and linear approximations, transfer functions of linear systems, block diagrams and signal flow graphs, sensitivity, control of transient response, disturbance signals, time domain performance: steady state errors, performance indices, stability related to s-plane location of the roots of the characteristic equation, Routh-Hurwitz criterion, graphical analysis techniques: root locus, frequency response as polar plot and Bode diagrams, closed loop frequency response. A control system design project is included in the course. 3 credits.

ETEC.3550 Electronics I and Laboratory

This course introduces Electronics from a fundamental perspective and analyses of circuits from a practical point of view. Semiconductor devices and their application are stressed. This course surveys the operating characteristics of pn junction diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers, and analyzes their application in actual circuits. The use of diodes in power switching circuits and the use of transistors in logic circuits and amplifiers will be covered extensively. Examples and homework, based on present-day applications, are designed to provide practice in the use of fundamental concepts and applications. It is expected that following the four-course electronic sequence, students will be able to use the textbook used in this course or other professional level electronic texts for further study of specific electronic topics. The course includes computer applications in solving problems involving models of electronic devices and circuits. Coverage of some topics is based on notes handed out that augments coverage in Sedra and SMith. 2 credits.

FINA.3010 Financial Management

Principles of financial management, including working and fixed capital, sources of funds, financial statements, financial planning and capital structure. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON2010, ACCT2010 pre; BU min

FINA.3210 Investment and Portfolio Analysis

This course is a survey of investments for business students. Topics include the investment environment, markets and instruments, securities trading, market indexes, risk, diversification, the capital asset pricing model, market efficiency, introductory valuation of bonds stocks options and futures, mutual funds, behavioral finance, and strategies for individual inves-tors. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Information Literacy (IL).

FINA.4910 International Finance

Financial aspects of international business operations. Evaluation of risks associated with multinational operation and managerial decision making under conditions of financial uncertainty. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FINA.3010 pre-req

GRFX.2000 Introduction to Graphic Design

Exercises, lectures and projects will introduce students to graphic design principles and techniques. Course will begin with a fundamental study of image, form, and space relations, then cover such topics as working with grids, typography basics, page layout, the introduction of color, rendering techniques, history, and more. Students will be assigned a series of projects to enhance their visual communication skills. Formerly 70.291 & 70.210. 3 credits/3 contact hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Basic Computer Prof. (CSCE) Special Notes: Access to Adobe's Creative Cloud Software requires a monthly Creative Cloud membership subscription. Special pricing is available for students: Visit https://creative.adobe.com/plans?plan=edu Note: While the above courses will not transfer directly into the Art Department's Bachelor of Fine Arts Day School degree program, certain two-course clusters may be accepted for transfer upon prior department approval.

GRFX.2020 Fundamentals of Typography

Studies typographic concepts, techniques, and the creative use of type in visual communication. Emphasis will be placed upon the history of type design and its context within the graphic design industry. Formerly 70.240. 3 credits/3 contact hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Basic Computer Prof. (CSCE) Special Notes: Access to Adobe's Creative Cloud Software requires a monthly Creative Cloud membership subscription. Special pricing is available for students: Visit https://creative.adobe.com/plans?plan=edu Note: While the above courses will not transfer directly into the Art Department's Bachelor of Fine Arts Day School degree program, certain two-course clusters may be accepted for transfer upon prior department approval.

GRFX.2030 Photographic Imaging

Covers the fundamentals of image enhancement, image manipulation, scanning, digital capture and using industry-standard photo imaging software. Image preparation for a variety of media will also be explored. Formerly 70.262. 3 credits/3 contact hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Basic Computer Prof. (CSCE) Special Notes: Access to Adobe's Creative Cloud Software requires a monthly Creative Cloud membership subscription. Special pricing is available for students: Visit https://creative.adobe.com/plans?plan=edu Note: While the above courses will not transfer directly into the Art Department's Bachelor of Fine Arts Day School degree program, certain two-course clusters may be accepted for transfer upon prior department approval.

GRFX.2040 Computer Graphics & Illustration

Students will produce a number of illustrations, starting with the traditional approach to illustration and then rendering their concepts using computer illustration and imaging software. Topics include methods for rendering artwork,capturing and expressive illustrative style, and portraying different moods or messages within the illustration. Students will learn to illustrate effectively using the many tools available to them within industry-standard software applications. Formerly 70.264. 3 credits/3 contact hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Basic Computer Prof. (CSCE) Special Notes: Access to Adobe's Creative Cloud Software requires a monthly Creative Cloud membership subscription. Special pricing is available for students: Visit https://creative.adobe.com/plans?plan=edu Note: While the above courses will not transfer directly into the Art Department's Bachelor of Fine Arts Day School degree program, certain two-course clusters may be accepted for transfer upon prior department approval.

GRFX.2120 Website Design

This course will focus on the creation of visual content for the web and will explore what constitutes a visually exciting and engaging site. Other topics that will be covered are: file formats, compression, web color strategies, and platforms standards. Formerly 70.379 3 credits/3 contact hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: HTML & Photoshop (CSCE) Special Notes: Access to Adobe's Creative Cloud Software requires a monthly Creative Cloud membership subscription. Special pricing is available for students: Visit https://creative.adobe.com/plans?plan=edu Note: While the above courses will not transfer directly into the Art Department's Bachelor of Fine Arts Day School degree program, certain two-course clusters may be accepted for transfer upon prior department approval.

GRFX.3120 Advanced Website Design

This advanced-level course is designed for students who have completed Website Design. The course will cover topics such as advanced css layout techniques, user-centered design, dynamic pages and testing. Students will have the opportunity to further develop their design and conceptualization skills. Formerly 70.384. 3 credits/3 contact hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: GRFX 2120 (CSCE) Pre-req Special Notes: Access to Adobe's Creative Cloud Software requires a monthly Creative Cloud membership subscription. Special pricing is available for students: Visit https://creative.adobe.com/plans?plan=edu Note: While the above courses will not transfer directly into the Art Department's Bachelor of Fine Arts Day School degree program, certain two-course clusters may be accepted for transfer upon prior department approval.

GRFX.3150 Design for Advertising

Instruction in the design and layout of commercial advertisements as well as the creative aspects of advertising are integral parts of this course. Practical problems and technical guidance from preliminary layouts to finished work will help preliminary layouts to finished work will help prepare students for the commercial art field. Students will prepare an advertising campaign concept and translate it into a professionally-designed commercial series for use in their portfolios. This course will focus on the integration of design with the overall advertising message. Formerly 70.392. 3 credits/3 contact hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: GRFX 2000&202,Familiarity/Adob Special Notes: Access to Adobe's Creative Cloud Software requires a monthly Creative Cloud membership subscription. Special pricing is available for students: Visit https://creative.adobe.com/plans?plan=edu Note: While the above courses will not transfer directly into the Art Department's Bachelor of Fine Arts Day School degree program, certain two-course clusters may be accepted for transfer upon prior department approval.

HIST.1050 Western Civilization I

This course surveys some important issues and tendencies in the history of Western Civilization from its origins through the early modern period, including ancient Mesopotamia, classical Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. These include civilization and the rise of cities, different imaginings of god(s) and humanity, evolving forms of political organization, continuity and change in social organization and everyday life, and the ongoing dialogue of faith and reason. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA). 3 credits. Special Notes: AHD

HIST.2420 World War II

The Second World War transformed states and people from East Asia to the United States to Europe. We examine diplomatic and military aspects of the war and how it affected the lives of people in the countries involved. Topics include the prelude to the war, military campaigns in Europe and the Pacific, collaboration and resistance, the home front, the Holocaust, science and the atom bomb, and the consequences of the war. 3 credits. Special Notes: HS

HIST.2750 African-American History

This course surveys African American history in the United States from colonization to the present. It begins with a study of life in West Africa and traces the forced migration of Africans to the Americas. It explores West African transmissions, the freedom struggle, the great migrations from the South, the Harlem Renaissance, the modern Civil Rights movement, and the continuing impact of African Americans on life in the 21st century. 3 credits. Special Notes: AHD

HIST.3650 United States History since 1960

Discusses Cold War politics and civil rights upheavals during the 1960's and 1970's, the decline of American economic and political power, and the resurgence of conservative politics in the 1980's. 3 credits. Special Notes: HS

INFO.2020 Microsoft Office

This is an intensive hands-on course intended to teach the student basic personal computer skills in a lecture/lab format using MS Office. The student will learn the fundamental concepts of word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation development. 3 credits.

INFO.2110 Introduction to Programming W/C I

Offers an introduction to the processing of information by computer. Computer logic, memory, input/output processing, and programming in the 'C' language. Students may not receive credit for both the INFO.2110/INFO.2120 sequence and INFO.2670. 3 credit(s). Prerequisite: No previous programming experience required. 3 credits. Special Notes: Students may not receive credit for both the 90.211/90.212 sequence and 90.267
This course qualifies for free MSDNA software!

INFO.2200 Visual BasicĀ®

This course will focus on developing Windows-based programs using the Visual Basic programming environment. Topics covered will include the use of text boxes, labels, scroll bars, menus, buttons, and the Windows applications. Students should be familiar with the Windows environment and with at least one programming language prior to taking this course. 3 credits. Special Notes:
This course qualifies for free MSDNA software!

INFO.2240 Advanced Visual Basic®

This course has been designed for those who already are familiar with the fundamentals of Visual Basic programming and are interested in advanced application developments. The following main areas are proposed to be covered: Use of professional controls, Using system objects and creating own objects, Programming with API and extending applications with API, MCI control and Multimedia programming, Building ActiveX components and creating/using DLL's, Introduction to programming with MAPI, TAPI, and Data Communications, Using Data Access Objects and generating Database applications for client server, Introduction to VB scripting and Internet programming, and Application Distributions - creating help files and application distribution using setup/install. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO.2200 Special Notes:
This course qualifies for free MSDNA software!

INFO.2250 Survey of Programming Languages

Introduces students to various topics in Information Technology to provide an overview of what is available and used in the technology world today. Topics include Functional, Object Oriented, and Scripting languages (C, C++/Java, C#, Perl/Python, Shell), Database Management Technologies, (SQL, Oracle, MySQL), Web Server deployment options (UNIX, LINUX, Apache, ASP.net) and Web Site Design and Development (JavaScript, AJAX, XML, HTML). Students should have a working knowledge of at least one high-level programming language. 3 credits.

INFO.2300 Introduction to Multimedia

Provides participants with an overview of multimedia and its professional applications in training, education, marketing, and entertainment. Scanning images, digitizing video and audio, and exploring the design and production of interactive multimedia are the focus of this class. Includes technical/hardware considerations and production procedures pertinent to interactive multimedia. 3 credits.

INFO.2310 Graphics for Multimedia and the World Wide Web

The focus of this class is on the basic components of shape, color, texture, typography, and images as they are applied to multimedia and web interface design. Other topics covered include scanning, image editing, resolution and color palettes. Students will work on projects that integrate elements such as buttons, navigation bars, and background images to communicate creative visual information. Photoshop will be used. 3 credits. Special Notes: Formerly Graphics for Multimedia

INFO.2320 Desktop Video Production

This course will focus on introductory desktop video production techniques. Using desktop editing software, students will complete projects including photo montages, interview sequences, storyboarding, pre-production planning and a five minute final project. Some experience with PhotoShop or similar software and access to a digital still camera or scanner is helpful for success in this course. Prerequisite: 90.230 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO.2300, familiarity with FTP software helpful

INFO.2380 Website Development

This course focuses on the design, development, and implementation of websites using available visual development tools. Each participant will design, build, and maintain their own websites. Topics covered include: basic navigational structure; page layout incorporating tables and frames; graphical design and placement; image maps; streaming audio and video; and basic website administration. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO.2910 (Introduction to HTML), Recommended: INFO.2310 (Graphics for Multimedia and the World Wide Web) Special Notes: Requires Adobe Dreamweaver software.

INFO.2480 Website Database Implementation

It is almost impossible to think about creating any sort of modern web site or application without the use of databases and at least a cursory knowledge of how they work. Almost everything online uses a database at some level whether it is an ultra-complex system such as Facebook or Amazon.com, a prepackaged tool such as Drupal or Wordpress, or a relatively simple site which requires a log on to gain access to some content. This course is designed to provide a straightforward but comprehensive overview of what these systems are, how they work, and how they can be incorporated into your projects. 3 credits.

INFO.2500 E-Commerce

Today, e-commerce has become the platform for media and new, unique services and capabilities driven by Internet technology, including developments in security and payment systems, marketing strategies and advertising, financial applications, media distribution, business-to-business trade, and retail e-commerce. This course provides an in-depth overview of the challenges and realities behind the planning, creation and maintenance of online businesses. While this curriculum doesn't include creating an online business directly, each student will learn what options are available to entrepreneurs looking to start a business online and what challenges and pitfalls may await. Students will learn about the mobile digital platform, the emergence of cloud computing, new open source software tools. 3 credits.

INFO.2670 C Programming

Introduces students to the techniques of programming in C. The language syntax, semantics, its applications, and the portable library are covered. This course is not an introductory course in programming. However, it will teach some of the basics in the first few weeks. Students should have a working knowledge of at least one high- level programming language. 3 credits. Special Notes: Students may not receive credit for both the INFO.2110/INFO.2120 sequence and INFO.2670
This course qualifies for free MSDNA software!

INFO.2680 C++ Programming

This course will cover the C++ language and show the student how to use the language. We will cover class construction, operator overloading, virtual functions, templates, and introduce the student to the IO streams. Inheritance and its use in creating extendible libraries will be presented. Object-oriented concepts will be presented in the context of the C++ language and its support for object-oriented programming. 3 credits. Special Notes:
This course qualifies for free MSDNA software!

INFO.2690 Advanced C++

Serves as a continuation of INFO.2680, with emphasis on Object Oriented Programming with C++. Design issues and programming guidelines will be discussed. Inheritance, dynamic binding, overloaded operators, abstract classes, and class hierarchies will be covered in more detail, with course projects concentrating on these areas. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO.2680, experience with Data Structures. Special Notes:
This course qualifies for free MSDNA software!

INFO.2700 Visual C++ .NET

This couse introduces students to Windows programming. Students learn how to create a Windows application using both native and managed code. Native proramming which allows us to create fast applications and managed code which is core of the .NET is compared and conrasted throughout the course. Course topics and hands-on exercises will cover: creating variety of windows, internet programming, creating Web services, using and creating databases and database programming and database connectivity, multithreaded programming, dynamic link libraries (dlls). Course will discuss interoperability with other languages (C# and VB) and with other software. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO.2680 Special Notes:
This course qualifies for free MSDNA software!

INFO.2710 C# Programming

In this course, we will explore the C# language paradigm. Our goal will be to understand the basic language syntax from its type system to its class structure. We will begin with topics on Classes, interfaces, methods, enumeration's, and access modifiers. Once we have mastered the fundamentals, we will extend our knowledge in areas such as the use of delegates, events, lambda expressions and exception handling. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO.2680 or INFO.3010 Special Notes:
This course qualifies for free MSDNA software!

INFO.2910 Introduction to HTML

This course is designed to teach you how to code cutting-edge web pages using the new HTML5 tags; We will introduce you to HTML5 web forms, and explain how to use them; We'll discover how to add multimedia content and how to use the Canvas element to draw shapes complete with fills, color strokes, gradients, and more; You'll learn how to combine the powerful styling and animation capabilities of CCS3 to enhance your web pages, and work with the technologies of HTML5 to make building web applications easier than ever. 3 credits.

INFO.2970 Introduction to Java Programming

This course introduces students to object oriented programming with Java(TM). Basic concepts are introduced early, with a strong focus on classes. Additional topics include event driven (Windows) programming and object-oriented design. Note that this is not an introductory course to programming - Students are expected to have a working knowledge of a least one high-level programming and/or scripting language (or equivalent experience) and basic familiarity with programming (using a text editor, etc). However, it will teach some basic programming concepts during the first few weeks. Previous programming experience required. Requires the Sun Java(TM) Development Kit. 3 credits.

INFO.3010 JAVA Programming

The JAVA (TM) programming language is now being used to write distributed Internet applications. Unlike traditional languages, the JAVA (TM) language was designed to be used on a network. Thus, it contains features needed to build efficient distributed applications that employ Internet resources. Those who intend to design World Wide Web information systems that fully utilize the Internet must have a working knowledge of this vital technology. This course allows students to explore features that set JAVA (TM) apart from traditional programming languages; obtain an overview of object-oriented design as it applies to JAVA (TM); learn about the fundamental constructs of the JAVA (TM) programming language; and write, compile, and include simple JAVA (TM) Applets within the content of HTML documents. 3 credits.

INFO.3020 JavaScript

An introductory course designed for the student who has mastered HTML and would like to add interactivity to his or her web sites. Topics covered include basic JavaScript programming, creating interactive forms, using frames and cookies, working with graphics and multimedia. Students will incorporate various JavaScript programs to their existing website. 3 credits.

INFO.3030 Advanced Java Programming

This course description is to be used for the on-campus course only. For online course description, see the Online site. This course assumes knowledge of the Java programming language, including exceptions, interfaces, and inner classes. It also assumes knowledge of the Java 1.1 event model and AWT. Topics covered include: Advanced AWT, Swing (both the lightweight AWT replacement components and the advanced components, such as Tables and Trees), streams, multithreading, network programming, database connectivity (JDBC), remote objects (RMI), JavaBeans, security, internationalization, and native methods. 3 credits.

INFO.3050 Survey of Perl/Python/PHP

The goal of this course is to provide an in-depth introduction to the Python programming language followed by an introduction to both the Perl and PHP. All of these languages share common functionality and are tools commonly used to solve similar problems, But each embodies a different philosophy and approach to solving those problems. After a thorough grounding in the languages basics, we'll explore their similarities, and, more importantly, their differences. By the end of the course, its' hoped, you'll have a good idea which of these tools is right for you and the kind of applications you wish to develop with them. 3 credits.

INFO.3060 Introduction to XML

XML (eXtensible Markup Language) picks up where HTML leaves off. If you've studied HTML, you've learned the Web's formatting language. To structure content on the Web, you will need to learn XML. In this introductory course, you will learn basics of XML and the DTD (Document Type Definition), XSL (the style sheet for XML), and CDF (Channel Definition Format) commonly used in push technology. 3 credits.

INFO.3080 Agile Software Development with Java

In this advanced programming course students will use Java to take a deep dive into the trickier and more subtle aspects of computer programming. This course builds upon the principles and concepts learned in previous computer programming courses allowing students to hone their programming skills while being introduced to professional software development best practices and current trends in software development methodologies, such as Agile. Using a test driven approach some topics to be explored include unit testing, object oriented software design patterns, testing design patterns, iterative development and how to write robust error handling code. The class focus will be on learning the lessons in what is considered to be the most important Java book written - Effective Java Programming by Joshua Bloch. Aspects of Agile including XP programming, as described in Extreme programming explained by Kent Beck, will be explored and the class will draw on lessons form Kent Beck's book: Test Driven Development as well as additional reading material Students will reinforce the skills learned through a series of short programming assignments with the goal of each being the illumination of a particular concept or best practice, combined with selected readings. A robust online discussion and debate about these topics will be encouraged. After successful completion of this course the student will know how to better design and structure code so that it works better, is easier to maintain, and can be more easily understood by others. 3 credits. Prerequisite: 90.301 Pre-req

INFO.3110 Introduction to the Linux/Unix Operating System

Addresses manipulating and maintaining files within the UNIX file system; creating and editing text files using the vi and ed editors; using pipes, redirection, and filters; using advanced text processing utilities; using electronic mail; writing and debugging shell scripts; submitting and executing processes. 3 credits.

INFO.3120 Shell Scripting

Teaches the students the techniques of programming in the high-level programming language of the Bourne, Korn, and BASH Shells. The course covers the building blocks necessary to create protable shell scripts that can be used as new utilitis for computers running either UNIX, Linux, or the Cygwin environment on Windows. 3 credits.

INFO.3130 Linux/UNIX Internals Overview

Focuses on the fundamentals of UNIX kernel architectures. Topics covered in this course are: the file system, process creation, signals, process scheduling, context switching, memory management, virtual memory device driver basics and the I/O subsystem, system boot, the init process. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO.3120.

INFO.3190 Introduction to Linux

Course addresses management of the Linux file system and utilities; file editing; file permissions; pipes, redirection, and filters; text handling utilities; mail facility; BASH shell, variables, and basic scripts; process management; and shell programming basics. Course content mirrors 90.311 but focuses on usage of Linux as an alternative UNIX-based operating system. Students will be exposed to Linux principles through hands-on labwork utilizing a Linux server. 3 credits.

INFO.3210 Linux/Unix System Administration

The course will start by exploring the booting and setting up stand-alone system. Students will learn how to set up and manage user accounts, how to manage other resources such as disk space, CPU usage and user access to shared resources with maximization of security in mind. Since virtually all systems are networked today we will proceed to learn about e-mail (POP and SMTP protocols), Web servers and networking services. The course will present the following Internet services: DNS, FTP, telnet, HTTP (Apache Web Server), SSH. The intranet topics will be discussed including Network File System (NFS), Network Information Services (NIS) and interoperability with Windows system via Samba. At the conclusion of the course students will explore topics in networking: network configuration, security and interoperability. 3 credits.

INFO.3460 Digital Media Delivery

Focused on the delivery of digital media, this course will explore digital media formats, file types, hardware and transmission methods. Students will gain an understanding of current delivery systems, the growth of the industry, and emerging technology and trends. Each student will examine the theory behind digital content, how it is delivered via the internet and in local environments, and what are the inhibiting factors to integrating digital content within web pages. Students will be responsible for several digital media projects. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Students should have a basic understanding of HTML and FTP. There are no required software or books for the course, all of the applications are available through free downloads. Note: basic internet headset/microphone is required.

INFO.3600 Intro. to Data Structures with C

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of data structures such as stacks, queues, linear and linked lists, trees, graphs, hashing, etc., using the C programming language. Algorithms for manipulating these structures, such as sorting and searching techniques, will also be covered. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO.2670 or INFO.2120, and INFO.3640 Special Notes:
This course qualifies for free MSDNA software!

INFO.3640 Problem Solving with C

Intended as a practical problem-solving course, to give students further exposure to the topics covered in 90.267 and to provide the tools needed for software development. The course emphasizes these aspects of the programming problem-solving process: problem specification and organization; algorithms, coding, debugging; the elements of good programming style; and the means of producing a high-quality finished product. Programming examples are chosen to span a wide range of both numeric and nonnumeric applications. 3 credits. Special Notes:
This course qualifies for free MSDNA software!

INFO.3850 Introduction to Information Security

This course will present an overview of the issues related to information security from a computer and computer network perspective. We will cover the threats to the information security infrastructure with a focus on the detection and prevention of them. We will discuss protection of PCs, servers, associated computer services (e.g. network, browsers) and data (e.g. file systems, email) through a defense in depth or layered approach. We will review major software packages, hardware devices, accepted technical and administrative practices that contribute to information security. The vulnerabilities and hardening of major operating systems such as Linux and Microsoft Windows will be discussed. The material is technical in nature however no systems administration or software development experience is assumed. Solid familiarity with the use of the Internet and computers is required and some knowledge of TCP/IP would be helpful. 3 credits.

INFO.4570 Network Security

This course explores the theory, mechanisms, and implementation of security in computer networks. Our goal is to provide an introduction to mathematical encryption and security protocols, and how these are applied to the infrastructure of IP (Internet Protocol) Networks. We will cover classical ciphers and cryptographic methods such as DES, 3DES, Feistel, AES, RC5, and Modern Public Key cryptography (e.g. RSA, Diffie-Hellman, ECC) and PKI (Public Key Infrastructure). The second half of the course will introduce the principles and implementation of Kerberos, SSL/TLS (Secured Socket Layer, Transport Layer Security) IPSEC (IP Security) and Access Control. The mathematics required will be introduced in class. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Prerequisite 1: INFO.4620 TCP/IP & Network Architecture or related experience, and Prerequisite 2: INFO.3190 Introduction to Linux or INFO.3110 Introduction to the Linux/Unix Operating System, or related experience. Check prerequisites in all prerequisite courses.

INFO.4600 Computer Ethics

This course is an introduction to the major issues surrounding the use of computers in our society, with a special focus on fields related to computer science and information technology management. The course will cover an analysis of major trends in emerging computer technology and their potential effects on work, leisure, government, and human relations. Students will examine the assumptions which underlie our culture's relation to technology and the relation between their own ethics and the values and ethics implicit in our uses of technology and information. 3 credits. Special Notes: VC

INFO.4610 LAN/WAN Technologies

This course discusses basic data communication concepts; digital and analog signaling; media and cabling systems; the OSI reference model; Physical and Data Link layer; LAN standards; Ethernet, Token Ring, FDDI, Switched technologies, emerging LAN standards; Bridges and Routers; and Network operating systems. 3 credits.

INFO.4620 TCP/IP and Network Architecture

This course is study of the TCP/IP and Network Architecture. We will focus on the concepts and fundamental principles that have contributed to the modern networks design and implementation using TCP/IP. Topics to be addressed in this course are IP, ARP, RARP, and ICMP protocols; IP routing; TCP protocol; Telenet, FTP, SMTP; TCP/IP next-generation; OSI network protocols and standards; Client/Server networking and applications. 3 credits.

INFO.4640 Network Management

This course will provide you with a general understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of network management. We will be covering the basics of network management and associated standards while also taking a look at some of the more recent technologies. We'll also augment the textbook readings with recent articles and papers that will pull real-world examples of how network management is used to help manage the ever increasing complexity of networks that we are so reliant on. 3 credits.

INFO.4740 Relational Database Concepts

Introduces database directives, design elements of databases, architectures, and commercial databases. Students will participate in design of a large-scale database application and administration of this database. Prerequisite; 90.267 3 credits. Special Notes:
This course qualifies for free MSDNA software!

INFO.4770 Information Systems I

This course serves as an introduction to Management Information Systems (MIS), emphasizing information needs at various management levels, including problem finding as well as problem solving. The course highlights the use of real time, distributed data processing, decision support and expert systems in the decision-making process of today's business. The student will understand how the use of different hardware and software can answer a wide range of 'what if' questions, crucial in today's planning function. 3 credits.

INFO.4780 Information Systems II

Serves as a continuation of INFO.4770, stressing the systems approach of MIS, focusing on methodologies used and the control over MIS as it relates to other business areas. Case studies are used to unify preceding topics as they relate to corporate planning, marketing, manufacturing, accounting, finance and personnel subsystems. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO.4770 Pre-req

INFO.4800 Project-Based Information Systems

This course looks at information systems from the perspective of corporate management, rather than at a technical or programming level. It emphasizes how managers can successfully understand and use information systems in order to better realize company objectives, such as the revenue maximization, cost reduction, customer satisfaction, etc. 6 credits. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Status

LIFE.1000 Introduction to Biology

Presents environmental and organismal structural interrelationships and relates these to the chemical evolutionary basis of life. Not suitable for credit towards any degree in the Division of Sciences. 3 credits. Special Notes: SCLO

LIFE.1010 Life Science I

Presents environmental and organismal structural interrelationships and relates these to the chemical evolutionary basis of life. Suitable as a Natural Science Elective for a degree in the Division of Sciences. 3 credits. Special Notes: SCLO

LIFE.1100 Microbes and Society: Good, Bad and Ugly

Examines historical aspects of microbial interactions with human society, including the use of microbes in food production, agriculture, biotechnology, industry and environmental preservation; explores bioterrorism, the problem of antibiotic resistance and surveys some historical and contemporary microbial diseases. 3 credits.

LIFE.1250 Plants and Human Society

This course is designed primarily to fulfill the science elective requirement for the non-science major. Its purpose is to provide the undergraduate student who is not majoring in the biological sciences with an introduction to the study of plants and their importance in our everyday world. The importance of plants in agriculture, medicine and industry will be emphasized. Not suitable for credit towards any degree in the Division of Sciences. 3 credits. Special Notes: SCLO

LIFE.2140 Human Ecology

Designed to reveal and discuss the increasing problems of overpopulation in regard to environmental deterioration, living space, limits of natural resources and the adverse effects of human alteration on destruction of the natural ecosystem. The implications of current literature and news items will be emphasized. Not suitable for credit towards any degree in the Division of Sciences. 3 credits. Special Notes: SCL

MATH.1200 Precalculus Mathematics I

Intended for students whose background in basic algebra is current. The course objective is to provide students with problem solving and computational techniques needed for further course work and in their occupation. Topics covered include: linear equations, slope of a line, quadratic equations, functions, transformations, inequalities, curve sketching, systems of equations, and the exponential and logarithmic functions 3 credit(s) Prerequisite: 90.11 or equivalent or satisfactory score on the Math Placement Exam given the first week of class. Credit is given for only one of the following courses; 92.120, or 92.121. 3 credits. Special Notes: Credit is given for only one of the two following courses: 92.120 or 92.121.

MATH.1220 Management Calculus

Review of difference quotient, least squares modeling, limit of difference quotient, differential calculus: derivatives, differentials, higher-order derivatives, implicit differentiation, relative and absolute maxima and minima of functions, and applications of derivatives to business and economics. Integrals and applications to business. No credit in Science or Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH.1210 Pre-req Special Notes: MA. No credit toward degree in science or engineering. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: 92.122, 19.125, or 92.131.

MATH.1250 Calculus A

Serves as a first course in calculus and provides a brief review of analytic geometry and trigonometric functions. The course progresses to the study of inverse functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, rules for differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, chain rule, implicit differentiation, linear approximation, differentials, and maximum and minimum values. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH.1230 pre-req Special Notes: MA. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: MATH.1220 or MATH.1310.

MATH.1260 Calculus B

Serves as a continuation of MATH.1250. The course covers L'Hopital's Rule, optimization problems, Newton's method, sigma notation, integration, area between curves, volume, arc length, surface area, integration by parts, trigonometric substitution, partial fraction decomposition, and improper integrals. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH.1250 or MATH.1310 Special Notes: MA

MATH.2250 Calculus C

Serves as a continuation of MATH.1260. This course covers integration by parts, integration of trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fraction, numeric integration, improper integrals, L'Hopital's Rule, indeterminate forms, sequences, infinite series, integral tests, comparison tests, alternating series tests, power series, Taylor series, polar coordinates, graphs and areas in polar coordinates, and parametric equations. 3 credits. Special Notes: MA

MATH.2340 Differential Equations

Topics include methods of solutions for linear and non-linear first order differential equations, linear second order differential equations, higher order linear differential equations, systems of first-order differential equations. Laplace transforms. Numerical methods. Applications to physical systems. 3 credits.

MATH.2830 Introduction to Statistics

An introduction to descriptive statistics, graphing and data analysis, probability laws, discrete and continuous probability distributions, correlation and regression, inferential statistics. No credit in Science or Engineering. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL). 3 credits. Special Notes: MATH.1115 or equivalent; MA; Previously 92.183

MATH.3210 Discrete Structures I

Presents propositional logic, combinatorics, methods of proof, mathematical systems, algebra of sets, matrix algebra, relations and functions, recursion and generating functions, applications to computer science, and graph theory. 3 credits.

MGMT.3010 Organizational Behavior

Examination of individuals, groups, and organizations from a behavioral and structural perspective. Topics include employee motivation and satisfaction, communication, power and politics, the dynamics of groups and teams, conflict management, and organizational design and change. 3 credits. Prerequisite: COM Filter courses,or BU minor

MGMT.3100 Human Resources Management

Current issues in the management of human resources. Recruitment, selection, work force training and development, reward systems, employee health and safety, legal issues, managing diversity, performance evaluation, and human resource planning. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT.3010 pre-req, MG Conc

MGMT.3800 Business Ethics

This course will explore the intersection between business leadership and ethics in various context. It provides the opportunity for students to explore complex issues in societal and professional contexts while engaging in probing conversations with classmates. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT.3010 pre-req

MGMT.4100 Negotiation Strategy and Process

Analysis and application of the key factors that shape and characterize different negotiation situations; the analytical skill to diagnose potential areas of difference and select appropriate strategies to address them; the interpersonal skills to tactically manage the spceific communication and decision-making behaviors during the actual bargaining; and the ability to recognize how one's own personality, value system and perceptions affect the choice of tactics and behavior. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT.3010 pre-req

MGMT.4200 Leadership Processes

Examines leadership as a dynamic influence process in organizations. The role of leader characteristics and styles, matching leadership behavior and situations, issues in power and politics, empowerment and participation, conditions for leadership effectiveness. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Information Literacy (IL). 3 credits.

MIST.2010 Business Information Systems

Structure and foundations of information systems for management from both a user's and designer's perspective. 3 credits. Prerequisite: COM Filter courses,or BU minor

MIST.3050 Business Applications Development

Provides an understanding of the fundamental concepts of software application development for business in an object-oriented, Graphical User Interface (GUI) environment utilizing structured programming concepts. Course involves hands-on application development in a 4GL environment. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS). 3 credits. Prerequisite: MIST.2010 pre-req

MKTG.2010 Marketing Principles

The role of marketing in the economy. The elements of the marketing mix--product, price, distribution, and promotion--are discussed in the context of social and political constraints on marketing activity. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL.1010 & ECON.2010 Pre-

MKTG.2100 Professional Communications

This course provides students with the theory and practice of successful oral and written communication in business. Emphasis is on the development and improvement of communication skills needed for today's fast-paced organizations. Such skills include written communication in short memos and reports, including the use of conferencing technology to convey information. Additionally, the course focuses on oral communication through presentations and discussions as well as the use of current presentation software. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BA-BBA majors & ENGL.1020 CW2

MKTG.3130 Sales and Customer Relations

Focuses on the concept of customer value, operating decisions in sales, customer service, and account management. Focus is given on calculating the value of a good or service to the customer, professional selling and sales forecasting, retail and wholesale operations, purchasing, and logistics. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MKTG.2010 pre-req

MKTG.3150 New Product & Service Management

Course number was formerly 62.311. Focuses on the process of new product & service development and marketing. Emphasis is given on market opportunity identification, R&D-marketing interface, business model development, market potential estimation, and market entry timing. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MKTG.2010 pre-req

MKTG.4020 Buyer Behavior

Applications of behavioral theories and techniques to the understanding of consumer and organizational purchasing processes. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MKTG.2010 pre-req; Com Filter

MKTG.4110 Marketing Analytics

Course number was formerly 62.312. Focuses on marketing strategies and tactics. Emphasis is given on research methods and applications for strategy building and implementation. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Quantitative Literacy (QL). 3 credits.

MTEC.1020 Engineering Design and Graphics

This course presents material in both class and laboratory format. Topics covered include: dimensioning, print reading, auxiliary views, graphs, screw threads, gears, and the design process. Working in teams, a major design project with written and oral reports is required. 3 credits.

MTEC.2000 Computer Aided Drafting

This course introduces the student to the use of CAD for construction of basic shapes and multi view drawings. It is a project oriented course introducing the student to graphic design using AutoCAD. AutoCAD, as it is applied in 23.200, is a two dimensional CAD program used to produce computer design models. Course stresses hands-on work with AutoCAD. Course is a fundamentals approach and requires no experience with other CAD programs. Pre-Requisite: 23.101 3 credits.

MTEC.2230 Mechanics of Materials

This course discusses the principles of strength of materials and the relationships between externally applied forces and internally induced stresses in various types of structural and machine members and components. Included are axial, torsional, and flexural loadings, stress-strain relationships, deformation of materials, elastic deformation, principal stresses, temperature effects, Mohrs circle, shear and bending moment diagrams, the design of beams, and the deflection of beams. 3 credits.

MTEC.4800 Computer Aided Design

Using Autodesk Inventor software, this course is a continuation of 23.200, Computer Aided Drafting. This course introduces 3D CAD techniques to demonstrate and utilize 3D parametric modeling in the design process. Solid models will be constructed, used to create assemblies, and drawings. These models, assemblies, and drawings will be modified and optimized using advanced operations. A design project and written report are required. 3 credits.

MTEC.4840 Introduction to Pro/ENGINEER

This course introduces the user to the principles of Pro/ENGINEER, solid modeling, and parametric design. It is a hands-on project and exercise-based course. Topics will include: feature-based parametric solid modeling, pick and place features, sketched features, the basics of creating parts and assemblies, and drawing creation. Advanced topics will include 3-D sweeps, helical sweeps, and blends 3 credits.

MTEC.4850 Introduction to SolidWorks

This course introduces the student to the use of CAD for construction of basic shapes and multiview drawings. It is a project oriented course introducing the student to graphic design using SolidWorks. SolidWorks is a three dimensional solid modeling program used to produce computer design models. Pre-Requisite:23.200 or some experience with another CAD program is required. 3 credits.

PHIL.2010 Introduction to Philosophy

Examines some of the typical approaches to philosophical questioning and the issues raised in such inquiry: what is true knowledge, what is reality, what is the good, what is the right political order, what is the nature of religious faith? Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS). 3 credits. Special Notes: VC, AHE

PHIL.2020 Introduction to Logic and Critical Reasoning

Studies the methods used to distinguish correct from incorrect reasoning. This course will aim at developing (1) an ability to express one's ideas clearly and concisely; (2) an increased skill in defining one's terms; and(3) a capacity to formulate arguments vigorously and to scrutinize them critically. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Quantitative Literacy (QL). 3 credits. Special Notes: VC

PHIL.2030 Introduction to Ethics

Examines the basic issues and problems of ethics and values and a survey of some important alternative answers to the questions raised, on both an individual and a social level, by our necessity to act and to live in a rational and human way. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE). 3 credits. Special Notes: AHDE

PHIL.2960 Introduction to World Religions

A study of religious knowledge and the phenomena of religion from a philosophical standpoint. The course considers explanations for religious behavior, some central issues in religious belief, and the values and goals of religious systems. Various world religions provide specific data for these topics. 3 credits.

PHIL.3880 Latin American Philosophy

Students in this course will be introduced to current and longstanding debates within Latin American Philosophy. They will also be exposed to many of the principle texts and thinkers within this burgeoning tradition. The class includes a survey of Latin American philosophy ranging from pre-colonial Aztec thought to the debates over the struggle for Latin American independence, and also the question of identity: what constitutes Latin American philosophy. 3 credits.

PHYS.1310 Technical Physics I

Presents material in both the class and laboratory format. Topics include: vectors; one- and two- dimensional motion; Newton's laws of motion; translational and rotational equilibrium; work and energy; linear momentum; and circular motion and gravitation. Two additional Friday night classes are required. 3 credits.

PHYS.1320 Technical Physics II

Covers material in both the class and laboratory format. Rotational dynamics; mechanical vibrations and waves; sound; solids and fluids; thermal physics; heat and law of thermodynamics will be discussed. One session per week. Two additional Friday night classes are required. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHYS.1310 pre-req Special Notes: SL

POLI.1010 Introduction to American Politics

An introduction to the politics, structure, and behavior of the American National Political Community. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE). 3 credits. Special Notes: SS

POLI.1210 Introduction to International Relations

Surveys some recent methods and approaches used in the study of international politics and provides an introduction to current problems of foreign policies of major world powers. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA). 3 credits. Special Notes: BS/SSD

POLI.2650 State and Local Politics

Examination and study of politics and government at the state and local levels, with emphasis on Massachusetts and New England. Practitioners from state and local government will meet with the class. 3 credits.

POLI.3530 Public Policy and Administration

An examination of the little studied fourth branch of government. Bureaucratic power in the American political system is reconsidered. 3 credits.

POMS.2010 Managerial Decision Making

Introduction to quantitative methods for analyzing business problems. Analytic methods include decision analysis, linear programming, queuing and simulation. Applications address issues in areas such as marketing, production, finance and logistics. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH.2830,3860 or ECON.2110pre

POMS.3010 Operations Management

Principles of production/operations management. Nature and function of production systems; operational planning and control; plant layout; materials handling; inventory and quality control. 3 credits. Prerequisite: POMS.2010 pre-req

POMS.4010 Logistics and Transportation

This case-based course will examine methods and strategies for managing and controlling material movement, with particular emphasis on international operations, from the purchase of production materials to the control of work in process to the distribution of the finished product. Strategies that will be discussed include the design of international distribution networks, the use of third-party logistics providers, and the creation of links between logistic systems and marketing to create competitive advantage. The course will also explore tactical issues that must be managed to pursue a logistics strategy successfully, including choices regarding means of transportation, packaging, and inventory policies. Underlying themes of the course will be the use of information technologies (such as electronic data interchange and bar coding) and mathematical models to support logistics decision-making. 3 credits. Prerequisite: POMS.3010 pre-req

POMS.4040 Managerial Quality Control

Views quality control from the total or company-wide perspectives. It contains traditional material on statistical process control (SPC), quality cost, quality assurance, quality information systems, as well as the recent management theories and ideas of Deming, Jurand, Ishikawa, and Taguchi. 3 credits. Prerequisite: POMS.3010 pre-req

PSYC.1010 Introduction to Psychological Science

An introduction course that focuses on application of the scientific method to major areas of psychology: biological, cognitive, developmental, social and personality, and mental and physical health. The course addresses the importance of social and cultural diversity, ethics, variations in human functioning, and applications to life and social action both within these areas and integrated across them. The research basis for knowledge in the field is emphasized. 3 credits. Special Notes: BS

PSYC.2320 Psychology of Personality

Serves as an introduction to the study of human personality including such topics as self- concept, anxiety and adjustment, and achievement motivation. Psychoanalytic, humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral theories of personality are stressed with consideration of the interplay between theory and research. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC.1010 pre-req or co-req Special Notes: BS

PSYC.2600 Child and Adolescent Development

The study of childhood and adolescence. The course begins with an overview of major theoretical perspectives, research methods, and ethical issues in human development. Based on a chronological approach, the course covers prenatal development and birth, infancy, childhood and adolescence, and the transition to adulthood. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC.1010 pre-req or co-req Special Notes: SS; Formerly Human Development I

PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology

Presents an introduction to the study of various patterns of mental, behavioral, and personality disorders with consideration of issues of diagnosis, etiology, and treatment in terms of contemporary theory, research, and practice. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC.1010 pre-req Special Notes: SS

PSYC.3080 Industrial/Organizational Psychology

An introduction to the application of psychological principles and methods to the work domain. Students will develop an understanding of the individual, social, and environmental factors as they relate to organizational performance. Intended as an introduction to the field of Industrial/Organizational (I/O) Psychology, topics include personnel selection and evaluation, training and development, attitudes and motivation, leadership, group dynamics, diversity, organizational structure and climate, and job design and working conditions. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC.1010 pre-req

PSYC.3510 Human Sexuality

Addresses the biological, psychosocial, and attitudinal aspects of human sexuality through lectures, discussions, films from a variety of perspectives. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC.1010 pre-req Special Notes: BS/SS

PSYC.3600 Adult Development and Aging

Begins with an overview of recent theoretical perspectives on adult development and aging. In chronological sequence, it presents the stages of adulthood and concludes with death and dying. Topics covered include personal, family, and vocational development through adulthood, gender pattern differences, and the impact of changing demographics, including the lengthening of the life span. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010,260 pre-reqs Special Notes: SS; Formerly Human Development II

PSYC.3630 Introduction to Disability Studies

This course provides students with a wide range of interests and backgrounds with the opportunity to examine their own mental model(attitudes/values/ assumptions) of disability. It includes an overview of the nature of mental retardation and other disabilities and it provides opportunities to explore and understand the historical social response to disability. Students will look at a range of strategies for providing support and intervention and they will learn about how to effect change through a variety of strategies, including advocacy. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHYC.1010, no FAHS.3630 Special Notes: SSDE

RADI.1010 Radiation and Life

This course will provide students with an understanding of the nature, sources, uses, and biological effects of natural and man-made radiations. Radiations discussed include non-ionizing radiations such as ultraviolet and microwave as well as the ionizing radiations produced by radon in homes and radio nuclides released from nuclear power plants. Students will have a better understanding of the risks and benefits of radiation in the modern world. Satisfies Gen Ed science requirements for non-science majors. Does not satisfy science requirements for Science majors but may be used as a free elective by Science majors. 3 credits. Special Notes: SCLO

SOCI.1010 Introduction to Sociology

Serves as the basic course in sociology. Emphasis is directed at the ways in which social institutions such as government, schools, the economy, social class, and the family develop and influence our lives. It is concerned not only with presenting various ways to understand our relationship to society but also with ways to change it. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA). 3 credits. Special Notes: BS/SSD

SOCI.2120 Cultures of the World

Focuses on a different country or region each time it is given. Students examine the traditional culture, recent history, economic development, class structure, and international relations of the area covered. 3 credits. Special Notes: BS

SOCI.2200 Self-Assessment and Career Development

Studies the meaning of work in our society. Class participants will assess their own life experiences and develop plans to integrate interests, values, and abilities into meaningful and realistic life/work options. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Jr./Sr. status Special Notes: BS

Program Requirements

All bachelor's degree candidates are required to earn a minimum 2.00 cumulative grade point average (GPA), to present a minimum of 120 semester hours, to fulfill the residency requirements, to conform to the general regulations and requirements of the University, to satisfy the regulations and academic standards of the colleges which exercise jurisdiction over the degrees for which they are matriculating, to satisfy the curriculum requirements established by the departments or programs in their major, and to complete the University's Core Curriculum requirements, which are listed within the program's curriculum outline. For additional information regarding the University's general policies and procedures, transfer credit information and residency requirements; please refer to our Academic Policies & Procedures.

Registration

The Division of Online and Continuing Education offers courses during the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters. Approximately 2 months prior to the start of each semester, we post the upcoming semester course schedule on our website. Once you know which course(s) you would like to take, current students can register using SIS self-service, while new students, who have not already applied and been accepted into the program, must use the Non Degree Registration Form.

You may take courses without being officially enrolled in a certificate or degree program, but you must meet the particular course prerequisites. Registrations are accepted on a first come, first served basis. Class size is limited. We recommend that you register early to reserve your place in class.

If you would like to be notified by email when we post our next semester's course schedule, click here.

For more information, please visit our Registration Information Page.

Tuition

Please refer to our tuition and fees page for up-to-date pricing information or refer to the Online and Continuing Education Course Bulletin each semester.

Transfer Credits / Credit for Prior Learning

Have you taken credit courses at another accredited college or university in the past? You may be able to count those courses towards your degree at UMass Lowell. Please review our transfer credit policy and email our advisors at Continuing_Education@uml.edu for additional details.

New Students

If you have not already applied and been accepted to the program.
Register with Non Degree Reg. Form

Current Students

If you have applied, been accepted and currently in a program.
Register with SIS self-service

Questions:

Online & Continuing Ed Support:
Email our Student Support Center for assistance, or call for advising at (800) 480-3190 and press 1 to speak with an advisor.

Restrictions

RESIDENTS OF Arkansas, Kansas and Minnesota: State and federal laws require colleges and universities to be authorized to offer online degree programs in states other than their own. Due to these regulations, the University of Massachusetts Lowell is unable to accept applications or registrations for online courses, degrees or certificate programs from residents of Arkansas, Kansas or Minnesota. Current UML students that move their residence to one of these states should contact Catherine_Hamilton@uml.edu in Online and Continuing Education to determine their eligibility to continue their program of study.

Please Note: While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information presented within this website, the Division of Online and Continuing Education reserves the right to implement new rules and regulations and to make changes of any nature in its program, calendar, locations, tuition, and fees. Whenever possible, appropriate notice of such changes will be given before they become effective. In registering for courses, each student assumes full responsibility for knowledge of and compliance with the definitions, regulations, and procedures for the University as set forth in our Academic Policies & Procedures and on the main UMass Lowell website.

Applying into an Undergraduate Degree Program

Complete the Online Undergraduate Degree Application Form (preferred), or print, complete and submit the Undergraduate Degree Application .pdf form. Please note: Your application will be processed once we have received your $60 application fee. Return your completed application along with your application fee to:

University of Massachusetts Lowell
Division of Online & Continuing Education
OCE Admissions - Southwick Hall, Rm 203
1 University Avenue
Lowell, MA, 01854

Questions? See our helpful Step-by-Step Guide to the Application Process.

Admission Requirements

To be considered for acceptance into a bachelor's degree program offered through the Division of Online and Continuing Education, students must hold a high school diploma or have passed either the GED® or HiSET®. Online and Continuing Education operates on a rolling admissions basis and each application is reviewed when the student's file is complete. Students must be admitted to a degree or certificate program in order to be eligible for most financial aid.

Apply Online

Questions Regarding Your Undergraduate Application?

Email OCE_Admissions@uml.edu or call (978) 934-2474.

For General Assistance:

Call the Online and Continuing Education Student Support Center at (978) 934-2474 or (800) 480-3190. Our team of Student Support Specialists are here to help!

Already Applied?

Check the Status of Your Application

Fees

There is a $60 application fee when you apply into this undergraduate degree program.

Restrictions

RESIDENTS OF Arkansas, Kansas and Minnesota: State and federal laws require colleges and universities to be authorized to offer online degree programs in states other than their own. Due to these regulations, the University of Massachusetts Lowell is unable to accept applications or registrations for online courses, degrees or certificate programs from residents of Arkansas, Kansas or Minnesota. Current UML students that move their residence to one of these states should contact Catherine_Hamilton@uml.edu in Online and Continuing Education to determine their eligibility to continue their program of study.