Available as a mix of on-campus and online courses!

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice: Paralegal Option

Work your way towards a Bachelors in Criminal Justice while gaining marketable paralegal skills. Our highly-ranked program prepares students to be competitive in a variety of industries.

Get more information today:

Curriculum Outline

The following course outline, which lists 3 courses each semester, is only a suggested course load. First-year students should not take more than 1 or 2 courses their first semester. Subsequent course loads may be determined by the student's own personal time constraints. Note: A 2.2 cumulative average overall and a 2.5 average in the major are necessary for graduation.

Course Descriptions

CRIM.1010 The Criminal Justice System

This course presents a brief history of the Criminal Justice System and an analysis of its structure and function. This course required of all CJ majors and is a prerequisite for all other courses in criminal justice. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA). 3 credits. Special Notes: For permission numbers and questions regarding the Undergraduate Criminal Justice Program, please email Christopher_Harris@uml.edu

CRIM.2340 Criminal Law

The historical origins and development of criminal law from the early common law to contemporary decisions and statutes. Constitutional and statutory factors as they pertain to criminal responsibility, capacity, crimes against persons and property, defenses to criminal charges and sentences. Sections of the Massachusetts Criminal Code and other statutes will be covered where applicable. 3 credits. Special Notes: For permission numbers and questions regarding the Undergraduate Criminal Justice Program, please email Christopher_Harris@uml.edu

ENGL.1010 College Writing I

A workshop course that thoroughly explores the writing process from pre-writing to revision, with an emphasis on critical thinking, sound essay structure, mechanics, and academic integrity. Students will read, conduct rhetorical analyses, and practice the skills required for participation in academic discourse. Students will write expository essays throughout the semester, producing a minimum of four formal essays. 3 credits.

ENGL.1020 College Writing II

A workshop course that thoroughly explores the academic research writing process with an emphasis on entering into academic conversation. Building on the skills acquired in College Writing I, students will learn to write extensively with source material. Key skills addressed include finding,assessing, and integrating primary and secondary sources, and using proper documentation to ensure academic integrity. Students will produce analytical writing throughout the semester, including a minimum of four formal, researched essays. 3 credits.

ENGL.3820 Theatre History I: Ancient Greece through the 18th Century

A survey of ancient to early modern theatre in its historical and social contexts, tracing changes and developments in acting syles, theatre architecture, scenic practices, dramatic literature, and the audience. The course examines how theatre both reflects and shapes the changing beliefs and priorities of a culture. 3 credits.

HIST.3080 History of Crime and Social Control

Analyzes the causes and development of attempts to control crime, ethnic conflict, radical protest movements, urban disorders, and attitude and role conflicts. 3 credits. Special Notes: HS

43.349 The Cuban Revolution

The Cuban Revolution has been surrounded by controversy since it took power in 1959. Through readings, films, and discussions, we will examine not only the events that have occurred in Cuba over the last four decades but also the ways that they have been presened to audiences in Cuba, the United States, and elsewhere. We will carefully consider the role of perspective in academic writing and the media and how it has shaped understandings of the Castro era. 3 credits.

LGST.1030 Introduction to Paralegal Studies

This course familiarizes students with the role of paralegals in both the public and private sector. Other topics include principles of jurisprudence and basic legal concepts and terminology. 3 credits.

LGST.2610 Introduction to Legal Concepts

This course serves as an introductory legal course. It is a survey of many specific topics, such as constitutional law, contracts, intellectual property law, and current legal topics of interest. More importantly, the course emphasizes critical legal thinking, legal ethics, and human values. 3 credits. Special Notes: BS

LGST.3630 Corporate and Property Law

This course studies the law pertaining to business entities and structures. Partnerships, limited partnerships, and joint ventures are studied at the outset of the course. The main emphasis is on elements of the corporate structure. The last part of the course deals with personal and real property with coverage of wills and trusts. This course is highly recommended for pre-law students, CPA students, and paralegal students. 3 credits.

LGST.3660 International Law

This course provides a broad introduction to international law with emphasis on current issues. Within public international law, topics covered will include the recognition of new states, organizations such as the United Nations and the European Union, the use of force, human rights, international crimes, the global environment, and international courts and tribunals. Within private international law, topics surveyed will include legal aspects of international trade and foreign investment, labor, intellectual property, cyber theft, and taxation. Current issues discussed will include global warming, recent corruption scandals, the Eurozone crisis, and legal issues facing global technology companies. 3 credits.

LGST.3670 Environmental Law

This course examines the legal and administrative problems of protecting the quality of the human environment. Federal and state legislation on environmental policy is studied. Public interest litigation as a supplement to the enforcement of environmental law is discussed. The course also focuses on the practical problems of balancing the needs of business, the global competitiveness of the United States, the increasing demand for natural resources, and the need to protect, preserve, and restore the environment. The importance of sustainable development and environmental ethics are discussed. 3 credits.

LGST.3700 Real Estate Law

This course examines contracts for the sale of real estate, deeds, title examinations, security for real estate transactions, methods and problems of co-ownership, zoning ordinances, brokerage contracts, leases and landlord, and tenant rights and liabilities. 3 credits.

LGST.3760 Family Law

This course studies the critical family law issues facing society today. Subject matter examined may include the law of marriage, custody, adoption, divorce, child support, juveniles, right to die, fetal tissue transfer to prolong the life of another, reproduction control, and surrogate parenting. This course is taught from a legal and human values perspective. 3 credits.

LGST.3790 The Relationship of Law, Logic, and Ethics

This course examines the impact of ethical viewpoints on the structure of legal doctrines. It stresses the fact that the study of law is a study of ethics as well as logic. 3 credits.

LGST.3870 Legal Research Methods

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of legal research and writing. Students will gain hands-on experience in legal research and in the reporting of such research in written assignments, case briefs, and memoranda. 3 credits.

LGST.3900 Litigation

This course examines the practices and procedures involved in the litigation process. Topics may include: legal research, courts and jurisdictions, evidence and discovery, pleadings, motions, depositions, trials and appeals, and federal rules of procedure. 3 credits.

LGST.4900 Legal Aspects of Cyberspace

This course introduces students to the law of the Internet and regulation of lawful and unlawful computer activities. Traditional notions about privacy, defamation, contracts, freedom of expression, pornography, stalking, jurisdiction and intellectual property are challenged by the latest cyberspace technology. Much of the debate about control, which leads to questions about rights and responsibilities, centers around who, if anyone, should design the legal architecture of cyberspace. These and other topical subjects serve as the focus on the study of legal issues in cyberspace. 3 credits.

LGST.4970 Legal Studies Practicum

This course consists of assigned fieldwork under the supervision and with the permission of the coordinator. The course is designed to broaden the educational experience of legal studies students by providing exposure to selected legal environments such as corporate legal departments, financial institutions, law firms, real estate departments, banks and government offices and agencies. This provides a correlation of theoretical knowledge with practical experience in an area of interest to students. 3 credits.

MATH.2830 Introduction to Statistics

An introduction to descriptive statistics, graphing and data analysis, probability laws, discrete and continuous probability distributions, correlation and regression, inferential statistics. No credit in Science or Engineering. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL). 3 credits. Special Notes: MATH.1115 or equivalent; MA; Previously 92.183

MATH.3630 Intro to Data Analysis

Computer analysis of data derived from research conducted in physical, social, and life sciences. Data preparation. Data modification, file manipulation, and descriptive statistics using SPSS. Programming ability is not required. No credit in Science or Engineering. 3 credits. Special Notes: MA

PHIL.2030 Introduction to Ethics

Examines the basic issues and problems of ethics and values and a survey of some important alternative answers to the questions raised, on both an individual and a social level, by our necessity to act and to live in a rational and human way. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE). 3 credits. Special Notes: AHDE

POLI.1050 Introduction to Public Policy

An introductory survey of the major forces and processes involved in the development of public policy; contemporary issues in public policy will also be considered. 3 credits.

POLI.2300 Law and the Legal System

Presents an introduction to the nature of the legal process and the operation of the American legal system. Also discusses considerations of its political and social functions. 3 credits.

POLI.2650 State and Local Politics

Examination and study of politics and government at the state and local levels, with emphasis on Massachusetts and New England. Practitioners from state and local government will meet with the class. 3 credits.

POLI.3550 Government Fiscal Policy

An examination of government's budgetary, taxation and expenditure decisions and activities. 3 credits.

POLI.3560 Public Policy Analysis

This course examine issues in and techniques utilized in public policy analysis. 3 credits.

POLI.3600 European Politics

An analytical examination of selected modern European political systems, emphasizing similarities and differences in political culture, behavior, institutions, and performance. 3 credits.

46.410 Reading Seminar in Judicial Review

Advanced reading and critical analysis in American Politics. Students selected will serve as group project leaders and tutors in association with a large introductory American politics course section. 3 credits.

PSYC.2090 Social Psychology

Presents an introduction to the study of social behavior in interpersonal relationships, groups, organizations, and the community: Diversity in regard to groups of peoples, cultures, and views is emphasized. Topics include non-verbal communication, social attraction, attitudes and attitude change, group dynamics, prejudice, labeling, stereotyping, interpersonal influence, and applications to social problems. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA). 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC.1010 pre-req or co-req Special Notes: Human Values, BSV

PSYC.2320 Psychology of Personality

Serves as an introduction to the study of human personality including such topics as self- concept, anxiety and adjustment, and achievement motivation. Psychoanalytic, humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral theories of personality are stressed with consideration of the interplay between theory and research. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC.1010 pre-req or co-req Special Notes: BS

PSYC.2600 Child and Adolescent Development

The study of childhood and adolescence. The course begins with an overview of major theoretical perspectives, research methods, and ethical issues in human development. Based on a chronological approach, the course covers prenatal development and birth, infancy, childhood and adolescence, and the transition to adulthood. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC.1010 pre-req or co-req Special Notes: SS; Formerly Human Development I

PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology

Presents an introduction to the study of various patterns of mental, behavioral, and personality disorders with consideration of issues of diagnosis, etiology, and treatment in terms of contemporary theory, research, and practice. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC.1010 pre-req Special Notes: SS

PSYC.3600 Adult Development and Aging

Begins with an overview of recent theoretical perspectives on adult development and aging. In chronological sequence, it presents the stages of adulthood and concludes with death and dying. Topics covered include personal, family, and vocational development through adulthood, gender pattern differences, and the impact of changing demographics, including the lengthening of the life span. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010,260 pre-reqs Special Notes: SS; Formerly Human Development II

SOCI.2310 Sociology of the Family

Studies the nature of the family in contemporary society, with particular emphasis on the family in America. What functions does the family perform in modern society? How is it changing? How do these changes affect our lives? 3 credits. Special Notes: BS

SOCI.2340 Race and Ethnicity

This course locates and studies the sociological dynamics of race and ethnic relations in the United States as it pertains to all groups. The course material presents theories and models that explain periods of conflict and cooperation between diverse sets of people. While providing some historical background, the course focuses primarily on recent and contemporary situations. 3 credits.

SOCI.2550 Sociology of Deviance

Analysis of how social institutions define and respond to various forms of social deviance, from individual mental illness to gang violence to illegal acts by governments and corporations. Attention will be paid to the construction and management of deviant identities, the role played by social status, and the social importance of institutions of social control. 3 credits. Special Notes: BS

SOCI.2560 Political Sociology

Focuses on the development and use of power in modern society. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of American political institutions to economic institutions, to social class, and to supporting ideologies. 3 credits.

SOCI.3410 Wealth, Status and Power

Focuses on the phenomenon of social class distinctions with particular emphasis on social class in America. The approach is both historical and sociological. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCI.1010 pre-req

SOCI.3450 Urban Sociology

Deals with issues related to the quality of life in American cities. Students taking this course may engage in research projects on the city of Lowell and the role of the University of Massachusetts Lowell within that city. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCI.1010 pre-req

SOCI.3610 Sociology of Law

The course examines the role of social forces in defining the law. Topics include the legal profession, white-collar crime, and the importance of race, class and gender in the criminal justice system. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCI.1010.

48.402 Research I Quan. Methods

An introduction to methods of social research, with emphasis on quantitative research methods. Presents basic statistical techniques used in social research as well as the computer software used for analyzing social science data. For majors only. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Sociology majors only

41.368 Employment Law

Discusses legislative and judicial decisions and the Department of Labor's administrative rulings relative to the management-labor process. Reviews the sources of labor law and employer and union unfair labor practices. Emphasizes the Occupational Safety Health Act, the Civil Rights Act, the Equal Opportunity Act, and the National Labor Relations Act. 3 credits.

41.371 Legal Issues in Health Care

Examines the law of private and public health care. The rights and responsibilities of the health care professional to patient and society are investigated. Current health, political, economic, legal and societal issues affecting government, individuals, health care providers and insurance carriers are reviewed. 3 credits.

43.216 American Environmental History

This course is not yet avaliable. 3 credits.

43.217 American Urban History II

This course is not yet avaliable. 3 credits.

43.268 History of the Family and Childhood in the U.S.

This course is not yet avaliable. 3 credits.

43.349 The Cuban Revolution

The Cuban Revolution has been surrounded by controversy since it took power in 1959. Through readings, films, and discussions, we will examine not only the events that have occurred in Cuba over the last four decades but also the ways that they have been presened to audiences in Cuba, the United States, and elsewhere. We will carefully consider the role of perspective in academic writing and the media and how it has shaped understandings of the Castro era. 3 credits. Prerequisite: 43.106

44.301 Computer Applications for the Legal Profession

Introduces students to legal applications utilizing PC's. Emphasis is on hands-on instruction in a variety of legal software packages including word processing, spreadsheets, and database management. 3 credits. Prerequisite: LGST.1030. Special Notes: For permission numbers and questions regarding the Undergraduate Criminal Justice Program, please email Christopher_Harris@uml.edu

46.270 Legislative Politics

A comparative study of the political realities and currents which affect policy making in the American Congress and the Massachusetts State Legislature. Among the areas of study will be the qualities which are essential to successfully run and hold onto legislative office and the influence those political factors have on the making of laws. Students will participate in a simulated campaign for state legislative office, which include budgeting, advertising and communicating a campaign message. 3 credits.

46.345 Constitutional Law and Politics

An advanced study of American constitutional doctrine as it has developed historically through the process of constitutional adjudication. 3 credits. Special Notes: BS, CJ Collateral

46.347 Civil Liberties

An advanced study of the meaning of liberty in America is pursued through an examination of the development of constitutional doctrine and the resulting nationalization of American concepts of civil liberty. 3 credits.

46.410 Reading Seminar in Judicial Review

Advanced reading and critical analysis in American Politics. Students selected will serve as group project leaders and tutors in association with a large introductory American politics course section. 3 credits.

47.364 Psychology of Crime and Corrections

Investigates the psychological aspects of crime and deviance and the nature of punishment and rehabilitation. Studies clinical case histories of criminal personalities in conjunction with contemporary psychological theory and research concerning antisocial and delinquent behavior. The nature of prisons, the criminal justice system, and aspects of psychological services are considered. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC.1010.

48.235 Black Experience in American Life

This course is not yet avaliable. 3 credits.

48.402 Sociological Research I

An introduction to methods of social research, with emphasis on quantitative research methods. Presents basic statistical techniques used in social research as well as the computer software used for analyzing social science data. For majors only. 3 credits.

Program Requirements

All bachelor's degree candidates are required to earn a minimum 2.00 cumulative grade point average (GPA), to present a minimum of 120 semester hours, to fulfill the residency requirements, to conform to the general regulations and requirements of the University, to satisfy the regulations and academic standards of the colleges which exercise jurisdiction over the degrees for which they are matriculating, to satisfy the curriculum requirements established by the departments or programs in their major, and to complete the University's Core Curriculum requirements, which are listed within the program's curriculum outline. For additional information regarding the University's general policies and procedures, transfer credit information and residency requirements; please refer to our Academic Policies & Procedures.

Registration

The Division of Online & Continuing Education offers courses during the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters. Approximately two months prior to the start of each semester, we post the upcoming semester course schedule on our website. Once you know which course(s) you would like to take, current students can register using SIS Self-Service, while new students, who have not already applied and been accepted into a program, must use the Non-Degree Registration Form.

You may take courses without being officially enrolled in a certificate or degree program, but you must meet the particular course prerequisites. Registrations are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Class size is limited. We recommend that you register early to reserve your place in class.

If you would like to be notified by email when we post our next semester's course schedule, click here.

For more information, please visit our Registration Information Page .

Tuition

Please refer to our tuition and fees page for up-to-date pricing information or refer to the Online & Continuing Education Course Bulletin that is published each semester.

Transfer Credits / Credit for Prior Learning

Have you taken credit courses at another accredited college or university in the past? You may be able to count those courses towards your degree at UMass Lowell. Please review our transfer credit policy and email our advisors at Continuing_Education@uml.edu for additional details.

New Students

If you have not already applied and been accepted to a program.
Register with Non-Degree Reg. Form

Current Students

If you have applied, been accepted and are currently enrolled in a program.
Register with SIS Self-Service

Questions:

Online & Continuing Ed Support:
Email our Student Support Center for assistance, or call 800-480-3190 and press 1 to speak with an advisor.

Restrictions

RESIDENTS OF Arkansas, Kansas and Minnesota: State and federal laws require colleges and universities to be authorized to offer online degree programs in states other than their own. Due to these regulations, the University of Massachusetts Lowell is unable to accept applications or registrations for online courses, degrees or certificate programs from residents of Arkansas, Kansas or Minnesota. Current UML students that move their residence to one of these states should contact Catherine_Hamilton@uml.edu in Online & Continuing Education to determine their eligibility to continue their program of study.

Please Note: While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information presented within this website, the Division of Online & Continuing Education reserves the right to implement new rules and regulations and to make changes of any nature in its program, calendar, locations, tuition and fees. Whenever possible, appropriate notice of such changes will be given before they become effective. In registering for courses, each student assumes full responsibility for knowledge of and compliance with the definitions, regulations, and procedures for the University as set forth in our Academic Policies & Procedures and on the main UMass Lowell website.

Applying into an Undergraduate Degree Program

Complete the Online Undergraduate Degree Application Form (preferred), or print, complete and submit the Undergraduate Degree Application .pdf form. Please note: Your application will be processed once we have received your $60 application fee. Return your completed application along with your application fee to:

University of Massachusetts Lowell
Division of Online & Continuing Education
OCE Admissions - Southwick Hall, Rm 203
1 University Avenue
Lowell, MA, 01854

Questions? See our helpful Step-by-Step Guide to the Application Process.

Admission Requirements

To be considered for acceptance into a bachelor's degree program offered through the Division of Online and Continuing Education, students must hold a high school diploma or have passed either the GED® or HiSET®. Online and Continuing Education operates on a rolling admissions basis and each application is reviewed when the student's file is complete. Students must be admitted to a degree or certificate program in order to be eligible for most financial aid.

Apply Online

Questions Regarding Your Undergraduate Application?

Email OCE_Admissions@uml.edu or call (978) 934-2474.

For General Assistance:

Call the Online and Continuing Education Student Support Center at (978) 934-2474 or (800) 480-3190. Our team of Student Support Specialists are here to help!

Already Applied?

Check the Status of Your Application

Fees

There is a $60 application fee when you apply into this undergraduate degree program.

Restrictions

RESIDENTS OF Arkansas, Kansas and Minnesota: State and federal laws require colleges and universities to be authorized to offer online degree programs in states other than their own. Due to these regulations, the University of Massachusetts Lowell is unable to accept applications or registrations for online courses, degrees or certificate programs from residents of Arkansas, Kansas or Minnesota. Current UML students that move their residence to one of these states should contact Catherine_Hamilton@uml.edu in Online & Continuing Education to determine their eligibility to continue their program of study.