Available as a mix of on-campus and online courses!

Associate of Science in Electronic Engineering Technology

Looking to advance your career in electronics? With a mix of on-campus engineering and online elective courses, UMass Lowell's 24-course program prepares students to succeed in this versatile field.

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Start Earning Your Associates in Electronic Engineering Technology

Students in the Electronic Engineering Technology associate's degree program learn about the fundamentals of circuit design, voltage, semiconductor devices, theory vs. simulation, transistors, microprocessors and more. The program helps prepare students for employment in a variety of fields including consumer electronics, telecommunications, and semiconductors - wherever there is a need for the design, testing, and manufacturing of hardware and software for all things electrical.

The amount of time it takes for a student to complete the program will depend upon the individual student's course load. Students can earn the Associate's Degree in Electronic Engineering Technology (64 credits) as a first step towards earning the Bachelor's Degree in Electronic Engineering Technology (127 credits). Many of the courses taken toward this degree can be also applied toward a related certificate program, allowing students to earn additional credentials as they pursue their degree.

Note: Although some of the courses in this program are available online, the majority of the courses are only available on campus.

Curriculum Outline

- Total Credits: 64
- For students who entered the program in or after September 2009
- First-year students should not take more than 1 or 2 courses their first semester. Subsequent course loads may be determined by the student's own personal time constraints.

Students enrolling in this program should purchase an electronic calculator capable of handling logarithmic and trigonometric functions. The use of the calculator will be an integral part of courses ETEC.2130 and ETEC.2140, where proficiency will be developed.

Competency in the use of the calculator will be assumed in all subsequent E.E.T. courses.

Proper approval for a ETEC.3/4-- course is automatically assumed if all prerequisites are satisfied.

Course Descriptions

ENGL.1010 College Writing I

A workshop course that thoroughly explores the writing process from pre-writing to revision, with an emphasis on critical thinking, sound essay structure, mechanics, and academic integrity. Students will read, conduct rhetorical analyses, and practice the skills required for participation in academic discourse. Students will write expository essays throughout the semester, producing a minimum of four formal essays. 3 credits.


ENGL.1020 College Writing II

A workshop course that thoroughly explores the academic research writing process with an emphasis on entering into academic conversation. Building on the skills acquired in College Writing I, students will learn to write extensively with source material. Key skills addressed include finding,assessing, and integrating primary and secondary sources, and using proper documentation to ensure academic integrity. Students will produce analytical writing throughout the semester, including a minimum of four formal, researched essays. 3 credits.


ETEC.2130 Electric Circuits I

Discusses: electrical circuits; voltage, current and resistance; energy, power and charge; Ohm's Law, Kirchhoff's Current Law and Kirchhoff's Voltage Law; simplification and conversion techniques for networks containing sources and/or resistance; Thevenin's and Norton's theorems; fundamentals of magnetism and magnetic circuits; properties of capacitance and inductance and associated transient behavior of circuits. 3 credits.


ETEC.2140 Circuits II and Laboratory

This course provides a continuation of 17.213. Topics include sinusoidal waveforms, phasors, impedance and network elements. Mesh and nodal analysis of AC circuits; series and parallel circuits, superposition and Wye/Delta conversions are also covered. The use of power supplies and various electrical measuring instruments will be studied. DC circuit analysis concepts studied in 17.213 will be verified by laboratory experiments. Written reports are required. Alternate lecture and laboratory sessions. 2 credits.


ETEC.2150 Circuits III and Laboratory

This course serves as a continuation of 17.214. Topics to be discussed include maximum power transfer, real and reactive power; resonance; and polyphase systems. Oscilloscopes, voltage, current and phase measurements are demonstrated. Other topics include series and parallel sinusoidal circuits, series-parallel sinusoidal circuits, series resonance, parallel resonance and transformers. Filters, 2-port networks, computer aided circuit analysis (PSPICE). Computer terminals will be available in the laboratory and their use is expected. Written reports are required. Alternate lecture and laboratory sessions. 2 credits.


ETEC.2160 Circuits IV

Advanced Circuits is a continuation of passive circuit analysis, where the student is introduced into the frequency domain. LaPlace techniques are used to analyze electric circuits using sources and elements similar to those in earlier circuit analysis courses. The concept of boundary conditions is introduced along with initial value and final value theorems. There is a brief review of mathematical concepts such as logarithm, exponential functions and partial fraction expansion to aid the student for newer analysis techniques. The S plane is introduced as a graphical technique to plot the poles and zeros of a function and acquire an insight into the time domain. The dualities of electrical elements in other engineering fields (mechanical, fluids and thermal) are introduced and analyzed using LaPlace techniques. Bode plots are used as another tool to gain insight into the time domain. The cascade interconnect is introduced along with the concept of transfer functions and the impulse response. Filter circuits are again analyzed but this time in the frequency domain using the concepts of LaPlace and Bode. 3 credits.


ETEC.3540 PSPICE Simulation

OrCADÆs Capture is used as the schematic entry tool to generate circuits that will be simulated using PSPICE. AC and DC independent and dependent sources and device models will be used in these circuits that will then be evaluated by various simulation methods using voltage, current and frequency sweeping as well as temperature and time sweeps. The graphical analysis tool, Probe, will be used to display the results of the simulations and ProbeÆs mathematical functions will be used to further analyze the simulation results. All of these functions will be presented in a combination of lecture, homework, and hands-on PC lab environment. Applications learned in class will be reinforced by homework problems which will then be applied in the PC lab. Pre-Requisite: 17.355 3 credits.


ETEC.3550 Electronics I and Laboratory

This course introduces Electronics from a fundamental perspective and analyses of circuits from a practical point of view. Semiconductor devices and their application are stressed. This course surveys the operating characteristics of pn junction diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers, and analyzes their application in actual circuits. The use of diodes in power switching circuits and the use of transistors in logic circuits and amplifiers will be covered extensively. Examples and homework, based on present-day applications, are designed to provide practice in the use of fundamental concepts and applications. It is expected that following the four-course electronic sequence, students will be able to use the textbook used in this course or other professional level electronic texts for further study of specific electronic topics. The course includes computer applications in solving problems involving models of electronic devices and circuits. Coverage of some topics is based on notes handed out that augments coverage in Sedra and SMith. 2 credits.


ETEC.3560 Electronics II and Laboratory

This is the second course in a series of four courses with Labs. It introduces Electronics from a fundamental perspective and analyzes circuits from a practical point of view. Semiconductor devices and their application are stressed. P-and N-channel MOSFETs and junction field effect transistors (FET) will be introduced and discussed. These include linear small-signal AC models, and amplifier. This course surveys the operating characteristics of MOSFET and bipolar junction transistors (BJT) its circuit symbols; nonlinear large signal behavior and operational amplifiers, and analyses; their application in actual circuits. Large signal piecewise linear DC circuits, and small signal AC circuits will be studied. This course will include MOSFET and BJT as used in amplifiers, switches cut-off and saturation will be discussed. Examples and homework, based on present day applications, are designed to provide practice in the use of fundamental concepts, and applications. It is expected that following the four course electronic sequence, students will be able to use the textbook used in this course or other professional level electronic texts for further study of specific electronic topics. The course includes computer applications in solving problems involving models of electronic devices and circuits. Coverage of some topics is based on notes handed out that augments coverage in Sedra and Smith. Pre-Requisites: 17.215, 17.355, 42.226, 92.126 2 credits.


ETEC.3570 Electronics III and Laboratory

This course introduces Electronics from a fundamental perspective and analyses of circuits from a practical point of view. It is expected that following the four course electronic sequence, students will be able to use the textbook used in this course or other professional level electronic texts for further study of specific electronic topics. The following topics will be covered: review BJT and MOSFET, differential amplifiers, and frequency response of different types of amplifiers will be discussed, diff. pair, small signal analysis, biasing, current source, active load CMOS, Frequency response, Bode Plots cascode configuration. 2 credits.


ETEC.3580 Electronics IV and Laboratory

This course provides the student with the understanding of feedback. The course covers the feedback equations, the four topologies of feedback, two port theory, Bode Plots, active filters, Weinbridge Oscillators, and power amplifiers. There are two experiments the first covers finite gain, finite band width, output resistance, input resistance, and nonlinear distortion. The second covers multiple poles and loop stability, stabilization with three coincident poles, and loop gain for oscillation. 2 credits.


ETEC.3610 Project Laboratory A

The project lab runs for 14 weeks with design, fabrication, and testing of the project during the weeks one through twelve, and the last two weeks for presentation of the projects to the class. It is expected that all projects be presented operational and meeting the design performance requirements. There are exceptions to this. In the case of non-working projects the progress and final report will be heavily relied on for grading. 2 credits.


ETEC.3830 Microprocessors A

Introduces the microprocessor and microprocessor programming through an integrated set of experiments and related lectures. Topics include: binary, decimal, and hexadecimal numbers; the microprocessor; memory devices; structure of microprocessor-based systems; programming and instruction sets; addressing modes; arithmetic, logical, and shift instructions; branch conditions and instructions; indexed addressing; the tack; subroutines; assembly language; floating-point routines; and software development techniques. Approximately one-half of the course time will be an associated laboratory, culminating with a programming project. Pre-Requisite: 17.341 3 credits. Lab components and materials need to be purchased separately.


ETEC.3840 Microprocessors B

Extends the skills developed in 17.393 to interfacing the microprocessor to the outside world through an integrated set of experiments and related lectures. Topics include: architecture of microprocessor-based systems; microcontrollers; parallel I/O ports; interrupts; A/D and D/A converters; programmable timers; handshaking; and serial communications. The course will contain a three-week project applying the functions learned to a real world design. Approximately one-half of the course time will be an associated laboratory. 2 credits. Lab components and materials need to be purchased separately.


INFO.2670 C Programming

Introduces students to the techniques of programming in C. The language syntax, semantics, its applications, and the portable library are covered. This course is not an introductory course in programming. However, it will teach some of the basics in the first few weeks. Students should have a working knowledge of at least one high-level programming language. 3 credits. Students may not receive credit for both the INFO.2110/INFO.2120 sequence and INFO.2670
This course qualifies for free MSDNA software!

Prerequisites:

Previous programming experience


MATH.1200 Precalculus Mathematics I

Intended for students whose background in basic algebra is current. The course objective is to provide students with problem solving and computational techniques needed for further course work and in their occupation. Topics covered include: linear equations, slope of a line, quadratic equations, functions, transformations, inequalities, curve sketching, systems of equations, and the exponential and logarithmic functions 3 credit(s) Prerequisite: 90.11 or equivalent or satisfactory score on the Math Placement Exam given the first week of class. Credit is given for only one of the following courses; 92.120, or 92.121. 3 credits. Credit is given for only one of the two following courses: 92.120 or 92.121.

Prerequisites:

MATH.1115, equivalent, or passing Math Placement Exam


MATH.1230 Precalculus Mathematics II

Reviews angles and their measure, the trigonometric functions, solving triangles, law of sines, law of cosines, circular functions and their graphs, vectors and trigonometric identities. No credit in Science or Engineering. 3 credits. MA. Students may not receive credit for both 92.123 and 92.124.

Prerequisites:

MATH.1210


MATH.1250 Calculus A

Serves as a first course in calculus and provides a brief review of analytic geometry and trigonometric functions. The course progresses to the study of inverse functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, rules for differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, chain rule, implicit differentiation, linear approximation, differentials, and maximum and minimum values. 3 credits. MA. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: MATH.1220 or MATH.1310.

Prerequisites:

MATH.1230


MATH.1260 Calculus B

Serves as a continuation of MATH.1250. The course covers L'Hopital's Rule, optimization problems, Newton's method, sigma notation, integration, area between curves, volume, arc length, surface area, integration by parts, trigonometric substitution, partial fraction decomposition, and improper integrals. 3 credits. MA

Prerequisites:

MATH.1250


MTEC.2260 Technical Communications for Engineering Technology

This course introduces students to presenting ideas, data, and proposals in clear concise formats to maximize understanding and impact. Both written and presentation skills are stressed and familiarity with MS Word, Excel and PowerPoint is preferred but not a prerequisite. The end-product is a complete understanding of the elements which blend together to create effective communication in a technical environment. 3 credits. can be substituted for 42.226

Prerequisites:

ENGL.1010


PHYS.1310 Technical Physics I

Presents material in both the class and laboratory format. Topics include: vectors; one- and two- dimensional motion; Newton's laws of motion; translational and rotational equilibrium; work and energy; linear momentum; and circular motion and gravitation. Two additional Friday night classes are required. 3 credits.


PHYS.1320 Technical Physics II

Covers material in both the class and laboratory format. Rotational dynamics; mechanical vibrations and waves; sound; solids and fluids; thermal physics; heat and law of thermodynamics will be discussed. One session per week. Two additional Friday night classes are required. 3 credits. SL

Prerequisites:

PHYS.1310


PSYC.1010 Introduction to Psychological Science

An introduction course that focuses on application of the scientific method to major areas of psychology: biological, cognitive, developmental, social and personality, and mental and physical health. The course addresses the importance of social and cultural diversity, ethics, variations in human functioning, and applications to life and social action both within these areas and integrated across them. The research basis for knowledge in the field is emphasized. 3 credits. BS


Program Requirements

All associate's degree candidates are required to earn a minimum 2.00 cumulative grade point average (GPA), to present a minimum of 60 semester hours, to fulfill the residency requirements, to conform to the general regulations and requirements of the University, to satisfy the regulations and academic standards of the colleges which exercise jurisdiction over the degrees for which they are matriculating, to satisfy the curriculum requirements established by the departments or programs in their major, and to complete the University's Core Curriculum requirements, which are listed within the program's curriculum outline. For additional information regarding the University's general policies and procedures, transfer credit information and residency requirements; please refer to our Academic Policies & Procedures.

Registration

The Division of Online & Continuing Education offers courses during the Fall, Spring and Summer semesters. Approximately two months prior to the start of each semester, we post the upcoming semester course schedule on our website. Once you know which course(s) you would like to take, current students can register using SIS Self-Service, while new students, who have not already applied and been accepted into a program, must use the Non-Degree Registration Form.

You may take courses without being officially enrolled in a certificate or degree program, but you must meet the particular course prerequisites. Registrations are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Class size is limited. We recommend that you register early to reserve your place in class.

If you would like to be notified by email when we post our next semester's course schedule, click here.

For more information, please visit our Registration Information Page .

Tuition

Please refer to our tuition and fees page for up-to-date pricing information or refer to the Online & Continuing Education Course Bulletin that is published each semester.

Transfer Credits / Credit for Prior Learning

Have you taken credit courses at another accredited college or university in the past? You may be able to count those courses towards your degree at UMass Lowell. Please review our transfer credit policy and email our advisors at Continuing_Education@uml.edu for additional details.

New Students

If you have not already applied and been accepted to a program.
Register with Non-Degree Reg. Form

Current Students

If you have applied, been accepted and are currently enrolled in a program.
Register with SIS Self-Service

Questions:

Online & Continuing Ed Support:
Email our Student Support Center for assistance, or call 800-480-3190 and press 1 to speak with an advisor.

Restrictions

RESIDENTS OF Arkansas, Kansas and Minnesota: State and federal laws require colleges and universities to be authorized to offer online degree programs in states other than their own. Due to these regulations, the University of Massachusetts Lowell is unable to accept applications or registrations for online courses, degrees or certificate programs from residents of Arkansas, Kansas or Minnesota. Current UML students that move their residence to one of these states should contact Catherine_Hamilton@uml.edu in Online & Continuing Education to determine their eligibility to continue their program of study.

Please Note: While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information presented within this website, the Division of Online & Continuing Education reserves the right to implement new rules and regulations and to make changes of any nature in its program, calendar, locations, tuition and fees. Whenever possible, appropriate notice of such changes will be given before they become effective. In registering for courses, each student assumes full responsibility for knowledge of and compliance with the definitions, regulations, and procedures for the University as set forth in our Academic Policies & Procedures and on the main UMass Lowell website.

Applying into an Undergraduate Degree Program

Complete the Online Undergraduate Degree Application Form (preferred), or print, complete and submit the Undergraduate Degree Application .pdf form. Please note: Your application will be processed once we have received your $60 application fee. Return your completed application along with your application fee to:

University of Massachusetts Lowell
Division of Online & Continuing Education
OCE Admissions - Southwick Hall, Rm 203
1 University Avenue
Lowell, MA, 01854

Questions? See our helpful Step-by-Step Guide to the Application Process.

Admission Requirements

To be considered for acceptance into an associate's degree program offered through the Division of Online and Continuing Education, students must hold a high school diploma or have passed either the GED® or HiSET®. Continuing Education operates on a rolling admissions basis and each application is reviewed when the student's file is complete. Students must be admitted to a degree or certificate program in order to be eligible for most financial aid.

Apply Online

Questions Regarding Your Undergraduate Application?

Email OCE_Admissions@uml.edu or call (978) 934-2474.

For General Assistance:

Call the Online and Continuing Education Student Support Center at (978) 934-2474 or (800) 480-3190. Our team of Student Support Specialists are here to help!

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Fees

There is a $60 application fee when you apply into this undergraduate degree program.

Restrictions

RESIDENTS OF Arkansas, Kansas and Minnesota: State and federal laws require colleges and universities to be authorized to offer online degree programs in states other than their own. Due to these regulations, the University of Massachusetts Lowell is unable to accept applications or registrations for online courses, degrees or certificate programs from residents of Arkansas, Kansas or Minnesota. Current UML students that move their residence to one of these states should contact Catherine_Hamilton@uml.edu in Online & Continuing Education to determine their eligibility to continue their program of study.